HISTORY ETHNOGRAPHY NATURE WINE-MAKING SITE MAP
Selected and rare materials, excerpts and observations from ancient, medieval and contemporary authors, travelers and researchers about Cyprus.
 
 
 
 
 
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SALAMIS

SALAMIS IN THE ISLAND OF CYPRUS.
BY ALEXANDER PALMA DI CESNOLÀ, F.S.A.,
page 38

much older date than the gold setting which accompanies it. The scarabǽus is Egyptian, and its device, the urǽus, appears on another ring in the collection (fig. 50).

 

 

CHAPTER V.

BRONZE AND IRON REMAINS

PATERAE—MIRRORS— BOXES—RINGS—ARMOUR—MISCELLANEOUS OBJECTS.

N this material there are about a thousand examples in the collection. They consist of vases, parts of vases, mirrors, both Greek and Roman, bowls, strigils, weapons, such as lance-heads and daggers, pins, and paterae of different forms, ornaments for horse-trappings, fragments of a tripod, and other miscellaneous objects. In detail, it may be mentioned that there are paterǽ of no less than twelve forms. The first and finest which claims attention is a patera (fig. 65) engraved Avith Phœnician and Egyptian figures, and of great antiquity (fig. 66). Dr. Samuel Birch, Keeper of the Egyptian and Oriental Antiquities in the British Museum, to whom I am indebted for much valuable information upon my collection of relics, has given me the following account of this fine patera: " The bowl is very much decayed and covered with aerugo, so that the figures are scarcely discernible. The subject is Phœnico-Egyptian, and arranged into two portions; that in the centre, or medallion, represents a Phœnician or Egyptian monarch, wearing on his head the attire known as the atef, which consists of a conical crown formed of withes tied round the apex, and surmounted by a disk, thrice repeated, flanked by ostrich feathers, and placed on the horns of the sheep or goat. The single form of this cap is that found on figures of the Egyptian deity Osiris; the triple form is usually placed on the head of the Egyptian Horus, and of kings, especially the youthful Ptolemies, in the character of Horus 'pa neb ta', 'the Lord, of the World'. Bound his loins is the royal 'shenti', or tunic. The rest of his form is undraped, and it is uncertain if he wears sandals. The hair of the monarch shows the rounded form which came into use at the time of the Twenty-sixth Dynasty, or about B.c. 600; his head is bound with a fillet or diadem. This figure faces to the right, and has the left foot, in the Egyptian style, advanced (the Egyptian always marching or walking with the left foot advanced); his right is raised on the toes. He is in the act of striking with a mace in his right hand three enemies, who wear short hair,

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