HISTORY ETHNOGRAPHY NATURE WINE-MAKING SITE MAP
Selected and rare materials, excerpts and observations from ancient, medieval and contemporary authors, travelers and researchers about Cyprus.
 
 
 
 
uses Google technology and indexes only and selectively internet - libraries having books with free public access
 
  Previous Next  

SIR SAMUEL WHITE BAKER
CYPRUS AS I SAW IT IN 1879
page 49

View PDF version of this page

natural pavement where the rain had washed away* all soluble portions and left the bare foundation! cracked in small divisions as though artificially inlaid! Now and then a wretched specimen of the Pinus Maritima, about six feet high, was to be seen vainly^ endeavouring to find nourishment in the clefts of the barren rocks. I do not believe the tales of forests! having formerly existed upon the greater portion ofi Cyprus : it would certainly be impossible for anyi species of tree to thrive upon the extensive range of; hills near. Arpera, which are absolutely valueless. In many places the surface glistened with ice-like' sheets of gypsum, which cropped out of the cold white] marls and produced a wintry appearance that increased.! the desolation. I walked for some hours over successive'} ranges of the same hopeless character. Great numbers] of hawks and several varieties of eagles were hunt-j ing above the hill-tops, and sufficiently explained theJ scarcity of game. The red-legged partridges founds little protection in the scant cover afforded by the "' withered plants, and I saw one captured and carried off by an eagle, who was immediately chased by two others; of the same species, in the vain hope that he would givei up his prize ; he soared high in air with the partridge hanging from his claws. On the same day I saw another capture, and there can be little doubt that thepartridge forms the usual food of these large birds of " prey. The British government has already protected the! game by establishing a close season and by a tax upori all guns ; but there will be little benefit from the nevvl law unless a reward shall be offered for the destruction^ of the birds of prey which swarm in every portion o f the island—eagles, falcons, kites, hawks, ravens, crows,, and last, but in cunning and destructive propensity not

View PDF version of this page


  Previous First Next  
 
 
 
 
 
Our banners   Bibliography   Global Folio
All materials from this site are permitted for non commersial use unless otherwise indicated.
If you reduplicate documents from here you have to indicate Cyprus Explorer as a source and place link to us.
Created at June 2008
              Яндекс.Метрика