HISTORY ETHNOGRAPHY NATURE WINE-MAKING SITE MAP
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SIR SAMUEL WHITE BAKER
CYPRUS AS I SAW IT IN 1879
page 51

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34 CYPRUS IN 1879. [CHAPJ points round and hammering them like a coil upon the} leather ; the heads of these nails are nearly as large as a shilling, and the boots are exceedingly clumsy ; butf they increase the height of the wearer by a full inch. My amiable driver of the blue van, Georgi, accompanied me in my walk, and fired several useless shots at wild partridges. W e now arrived at the spot where the water is led by a subterranean aqueduct toi Larnaca. This principle is so original, and has from such remote times been adopted in this arid island, that it merits a detailed description. The ancient vestiges of similar works in every portion of Cyprus prove that in all ages the rainfall must have been uncertain, and that no important change has taken place in the meteorological condition of the country. In a search for water-springs the Cypriote is most intelligent, and the talent appears to be hereditary. If a well is successful at an elevation that will enable the water to command lower levels at a distance, it may be easily understood that the supply of one well representing a unit must be limited. The Cypriote well-sinker works upon a principle of simple multiplication. If one well produces a certain flow, ten wells will multiply the volume, if connected by a subterranean tunnel, and provided the supply of water in the spring is unlimited. It appears that Cyprus exhibits an anomaly in the peculiarity of a small rainfall but great subterranean water-power ; some stratum that is impervious retains the water at depths varying according to local condi tions. The well-sinker commences by boring, or rather digging, a circular hole two feet six inches in diameter. The soil of Cyprus is so tenacious that the]: Avails of the shaft require no artificial support ; this

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