HISTORY ETHNOGRAPHY NATURE WINE-MAKING SITE MAP
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SIR SAMUEL WHITE BAKER
CYPRUS AS I SAW IT IN 1879
page 91

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vestiges of ancient water-works throughout the country] Wherever an important spring existed, there was settlement of corresponding extent and value, whici suggests that the rainfall was even then as uncertain a^ at the present day. Every spring became a centre of attraction. The ruins of the ancient Kythrea hav^ been partially excavated by the indefatigable General Cesnola, but with unimportant results, as the grounc is under artificial irrigation, and is in the highesj cultivation, therefore it cannot be disturbed. The chief industry of modern times which adds the importance of Kythrea, is the production of sill from the great abundance of mulberry-trees whicl supply the necessary food for the silkworms ; but it haajj suffered to a considerable degree, in common with mos silk-growing districts in Cyprus, by the want of foresight of the producers ; these people have within the last fe\ years sold the seed in such extravagant quantities 1 the traders of Beyrout as to leave the island with short supply. The result of this sacrifice for the saké of ready money is a serious reduction in the general] produce, and in many portions of the island the muU berry-trees are flourishing without a silkworm to feedj upon them. The thirty-two flour-mills of Kythrea are worked by a fall of 400 feet between the head-water of] the spring to the base of the lowest mill at the foot of1 the mountains. It appeared to me that much water is wasted by an absence of scientific control. A series of! reservoirs would store the excess during the hours when the mills are idle (similar to the mill-ponds in England); but as there is no municipal law upon this important? subject, the all-important stream is much neglected. There is a general demand for grinding-power through^ out Cyprus ; the corn is brought from great distances td

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