HISTORY ETHNOGRAPHY NATURE WINE-MAKING SITE MAP
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SIR SAMUEL WHITE BAKER
CYPRUS AS I SAW IT IN 1879
page 102

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ι tv.) Τιικ MESSARIA. 85 inside, and Hashed red, green, and yellow signals in wild confusion. I knew this piece of finery would not ι last long, as it would insist upon running against everybody's head, its large size bringing it into constant collision ; but it looked well, and ornamented the van. As it burnt several candles the lantern became hot, . which somewhat warmed the cabin, and was a welcome ι increase of temperature, for although the floor was protected by oil-cloth, upon which were double layers of Scinde rugs, the extreme thinness of the walls made it unpleasantly cold with the thermometer outside at 400. The servants were saved an immense amount of trouble I by the presence of the gipsy-van, which at the time they hardly appreciated ; they had no tent-pitching upon the halt, neither unpacking of boxes, nor arranging of beds, nor any of the usual work connected with a daily camp. It is impossible for the inexperienced to appreciate the comfort of such a vehicle where the roads are practicable, especially in bad weather, when you are perfectly certain that your home is weatherproof and your bed dry. Those who have experienced the misery of a halt in pouring rain, when everybody and everything has been sodden to the bone, when the ground is slush that will not hold a tent-peg ; the night dark ; the fuel will not burn ; the matches expend ι themselves in vain phosphoric flashes, but will not [ ignite ; the water that has run down your neck has f formed reservoirs within your boots ; the servants are reduced to the inactivity of sponges ; and—the tents I MUST be pitched. The heavy soaked canvas that can Ϊ hardly flap in the strong wind is at length spread over f the cold soft ground ; the camp-beds, though wet as 'tripe, MUST be arranged; and down go the iron legs, isinking to an unknown depth into the sodden soil!

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