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SIR SAMUEL WHITE BAKER
CYPRUS AS I SAW IT IN 1879
page 148

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CHAPTER VI. CAPE ST. ANDREA. Γ,.ΤιΐΕ promontory of Cape St. Andrea at the broadest portion is about five miles, and from this base to the (extreme end is nearly the same distance. The whole surface is rocky, but the interstices contain a rich soil, and at one time it was covered with valuable timber. < There is no portion of the island that presents a more deplorable picture of wholesale destruction of forests, as every tree has been ruthlessly cut down, and the present surface is a dense mass of shrubs and young cypress, which if spared for fifteen years will again restore this extremity of Cyprus to prosperity. I examined the entire promontory, and ascended the rocky heights, about 500 feet above the sea upon the north side. It was with extreme difficulty that I could break my way through the dense underwood, which was about seven or eight feet high, as it was in many places more than knee-deep in refuse boughs, which had been lopped and abandoned when the larger trees had been felled. The largest stumps of these departed .stems were not more than from nine to twelve inches in diameter : these were the dwarf-cypress, which would seldom attain a greater height than twenty feet at 'maturity. κ 2

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