HISTORY ETHNOGRAPHY NATURE WINE-MAKING SITE MAP
Selected and rare materials, excerpts and observations from ancient, medieval and contemporary authors, travelers and researchers about Cyprus.
 
 
 
 
uses Google technology and indexes only and selectively internet - libraries having books with free public access
 
  Previous Next  

SIR SAMUEL WHITE BAKER
CYPRUS AS I SAW IT IN 1879
page 225

View PDF version of this page

lower basin. A growth of young pines and other] evergreen shrubs ornamented the surface, and at I about a quarter of a mile from the summit of the pass J by which Ave had arrived we halted at a well of pure! water among a small grove of olive-trees. Although! we were at least 1000 feet above the valley, the water I was only ten feet from the coping-stone by measure-1 ment. There could be little doubt that the perennial-] stream in the deep glen was the result of the drainage ) of this extensive table-land, corresponding with similar* heights upon the other side. Having breakfasted by the well of deliciously cold water, we remounted, and continued our route alongij the extensive table-land. This was cultivated in manya places, but as w e advanced for two or three miles the! country became exceedingly wild, and we entered a wood of Pinus maritima, composed of young trees oil several years' growth, and older stems that had been! mutilated in the disgraceful manner that characterises^ all Cyprian forests. There was not one perfect tree " above eight years' growth ; but every stem had beenjj cut off about six feet* from the top for the sake of the 1 straight pole. Trees of fifteen years or more had I been mercilessly hacked for the small amount of turi pentine that such trunks would produce, and the bark; had been ripped off for tanning. Great quantities of mastic bushes covered the surface between the pines, and even these exhibited the continual attacks Of the woodcutter's grubbing-axe, which had torn up the roots, in addition to the stems, for the requirements of the lime-burner. The red soil is so propitious to the growth of pines that, in .spite of the unremitting destruction, the ground was covered with young plants, self-sown from the fallen cones. If these young forests were

View PDF version of this page


  Previous First Next  
 
 
 
 
 
Our banners   Bibliography   Global Folio
All materials from this site are permitted for non commersial use unless otherwise indicated.
If you reduplicate documents from here you have to indicate Cyprus Explorer as a source and place link to us.
Created at June 2008
              Яндекс.Метрика