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CLAUDE DELAVAL COBHAM
Exerpta Cypria
page 60

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On the eighth day about noon, the storm being over, ve set sail, and launching out into the main sea, we sailed by Colossus, a village of Cyprus, remarkable for its great plenty of sugar. We nailed by Piscopia too, a city which one of the kings of England unce rased to the ground, in revenge of his sister's having been debauched, having left her there as he was going to Jerusalem. On the tenth day we came to Paphus. This is a noble city, formerly the metropolis of Cyprus, and the palace of Venus ; now a very desolate aud ruinous place, as most of the cities of Cyprus are, occasioned by the frequent earthquakes that happen there, yet by the very ruins it appears what once it was. In Paphus the air is not very wholesome, nor indeed in all Cyprus, though it abounds with marjoram, hyssop, and other wholesome herbs. This city was built by Paphus, Pygmalion's son by Eburnea, who called it after his own name, and consecrated it to Venns, to whom also they dedicate a very large temple ; to which, as some will have it, when Helen arrived from Greece, being stolen by Pans, she repaired, and gave occasion to the Trojan war. Others will have this to be done in Cythera. Our stay at Corneo, a village. Presents made to us there. Cyprus described ; its situation, fertility, cdtW, inhabitants. Their grievous oppression. On the eleventh day setting out from Paphus, we arrived in the dark night at the town of Corsico, which is situated in a very pleasant valley, having a prospect over the sea as far as Cilicia, which is now called Scandilora. Here we spent several days, till the ship was loaded with com and silk. In the mean time we had presents offered to us of almonds, peas, and other fruits of the same year's growth, which afforded us no less subject of admiration than of pleasure and delicionsness, to consider the extreme coldness of the weather in our country at that very season. Cyprus, a noble island situated in the Carpathian Sea, in the middle of the greatest bay of Asia, lying from E. to W. in a right line between Cilicia and Syria, the most considerable and famous island in the world, anciently abounding with riches, too much addicted to luxury, and for that reason consecrated to Venus, is very large, and formerly had the wealth and title of a kingdom. This island is called Cethim in the Holy Scripture : is very fruitful of corn, abounding with silkworms, silks, oil, sugar and wine. Heie are very beautiful hills, most pleasant and delightful valleys, always resounding with the melodious singing of birds. Here are wann suns, shady groves, dewy herbs, green grass, and soft downy meadows to lie down and rest upon. Yet notwithstanding all this fruitfulness and pleasantness, neither its cities nor villages are much frequented, but as if it was barren and a desert place it is inhabited only by a few people that live in cottages. It has no cities but Nicosia and Famagusta ; the former of which is famous for its largeness, and for the ruling power of the Governor residing there ; the latter is remarkable for its harbour and fortifications. Besides all the inhabitants of Cyprus are slaves to the Venetians, being obliged to pay to the state a third part of all their increase or income, whether the product of their ground, or corn, wine, oil, or of their cattle, or any other thing. Besides every man of them is bound to work for the state two days of the week wherever they shall please to appoint him : and if any shall fail, by reason of some other business of their own, or for indisposition of body, then they are made to pay a fine for as many days as they are absent from their work. And which is more, there is yearly some tax or other imposed on them, with which the poor common people are so flayed and pillaged, that they hardly have wherewithal to keep soul and body together. We spent the rest of our time with a great deal of uneasiness in this island, being forced to tarry till the ship had taken in her lading of several sorts of merchandise. BAÜMGAUTEN

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