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CLAUDE DELAVAL COBHAM
Exerpta Cypria
page 61

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56 EXCERPTA CYI'RIA. LE SA1GE. Jacques le Saigc was a silk merchant of Douai, who died there February 11, 1549. He started on the journey to Jerusalem Marcii 19,1618, and reached his home on Christmas Day of the same year. His autograph, scratched on a wall of the church of S. Francis at Famagosta, was found in 1901 by M. Camilla Enlart, He printed at Cambrai an account of his travels, with the quaint title Clii senmyveni les giste* repaistres et despea* que moy Jacques te Saige marchant démoliront a Douay ay fait de Douay a Rome...et autres lieux. Jusque* au retour audit Douay. There may have been three issues of this work between 1520 and 1523, but conies are of very great rarity, and Möns. Η. Β. Duthilloeul did well to publish at Douai in 4to, 1851. the edition from which I translate here pp. 92, 93, and 185—151, though the text needs revision, and the glossary is very meagre. " Messeurs prence couraige de lire et vous ares du passo temps" (p. 2). The Flemish livre=8 marcols=20 gros or sols; the sou was worth 13 deniers. His journey, including 22 livres, 10 gros given as presents on the way, cost him 486 livres, 18 gros. To find the money lie had to pledge some property in Hainault, for no one would give him cash for his stock of silk. July 21, 1Ò1S. The wind freshened, and towards supper-time we saw the beginning uf the island of Cyprns somewhere near the city of Baf, where it is said is the temple of Venus. And about midnight we arrived off Ijiuiechon, where we anchored and did not land until the dawn of day. The landing at Limechon hi Cyprus. They reckon the distance from Rhodes at 400 miles. July 22, tho feast of the Magdalen. We left our vessel and landed at Limechon. It is now a village situated in the open country quite close to the sea, but there is no harbour. There is η castle which is pretty strong, and Limechon was once a walled town and large, but the English left it thus ruined to avenge themselves on the king of Cyprus, who debauched the sister of the king of Kngland, who was returning from the holy voyage to Jerusalem. They sold us wine pretty cheap, but it tasted of pitch, for they pnt their wine in a large jar pitched within, and draw it thence. It is so hot by day in the summer that we dared not leave our houses. Towards evening we went to see cotton growing; there was a large expanse of it. The twigs are as high as a turnip plant, the pods are as big as tho head of a wild poppy; and when the cotton is ripe the head opens, and one sees the cotton. Later we thought to return all of ns to sleep in onr ship, bnt our sailors were detained, and we were obliged to return to the houses, and Ave were even lucky to find such. July 23. When I awoke 3 had only to give iny head a shake. 1 went to see a small church where I found a Greek priest who was robing himself to say mass : but as he pnt on each vestment he made it catch the fumes of a censer. I saw him say mass right through, bnt it was wonderful to see tho ceremonies he performed. There is in Limechon another church where they sing after our rite, and there are fire Latin canons. I made my way back to our lodging, and on the way saw capers growing. To write of the other riches of this land I shall wait until our return, for, if God will, we propose to see the chief cities of this realm. Well, just as we had returned to supper, they came to tell us we must got back to the vessel. Seven or eight of our company swore to me they had been in the castle mentioned above, and had been shown the brazen head which spoke to Valentine, tho brother of Orson. I have written it down to record the fact ; I heard of it late, or would have gone to see it. But I hod to return. And as soon as we were on board the anchors were raised and our sails spread. Now I had spent at Limechon 20 gros (pp. 92, 93).

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