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CLAUDE DELAVAL COBHAM
Exerpta Cypria
page 68

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BORDONK îmSOT. ß:i POSSOT. Ou Monday, Marcii 11, 1532, Maistre Denis l'ossot, a priest of Coulommicrs iu Brie, and three companions met at the sign of the Swan at Nogent sur Seine iu the dtoeese of Troyes, visited the church of S. Lawrence, and offered a collation to the friends who had brought them so far on their road. The next day they began their pilgrimage to tho Holy Sepulelu-e. On the return journey from Jaffa to Cyprus and Candia, a grievous sickness befell them, and four of their company died. Denis l'ossot himself expired September 17, and was buried on the following day under the choir arch of the church of S. Francis in Candia. He had eonnded hie notes to Charles l'hüippe. Seigneur de Champarmoy et de Grand Champ, for whom they were printed at Paris by R. Chaudière, 1536. Had they received the authors revision we should probably not have found the Cypriot hares weighted with the fat tails of onr sheep ! Τ translate from the edition of Ch. Schefer, STO, Parìe, 1890 (pp. 185—151). (Wednesday, Juue 12, 1533.) Wo saw an island in which was a city called Cain Caput Album [Curium, near Capo Bianco ?]. Thursday, June 13, we anchored and took in stores to carry us to Jerusalem. Friday, June 14, when we reached the port of Lazarus we paid onr guide and captain for onr victuals and for the fare due to him each seven ducats, and came to a village half a mile from Larnacha, where we lodged. Saturday, June 15, £ sang mass in the church of our Lady. We saw two camels, which had big tails, tall bodies, long necks, little ears like a hare, and small nails. Sunday, June 10, 1 gave the Communion to my companions. Monday, 17th, we stayed in this place. Tuesday, 18th, we left in the evening and went on board our ship, so we were five days here. Cyprus is an island 87 leagues long and 30 broad, situated in the Adriatic [Carpatine?] sea, in the lordship and possession of Venice, for the government and defence whereof they send every three years one of the most distinguished of then- lords and gentlemen, to whom is paid due obedience as to the representative of the said Signory. This island is full of stony hills, is hot, rich and fertile in produce, and cheap ; with the best wines possible, such that one dare drink but ver}* little, so great is their strength. There is good wheat, whereof is made bread which is sweet and wonderfully good, fowls, doves and very fat partridges. The hares are large and have big, broad and thick tails, which make them sway nnd waddle, and strike those who see them with wonderment. The sheep are larger than those of our side ; some of them have six or seven horns, but one cannot eat their flesh for its unpleasant savour, one dares not taste it. The goats have long nnd pendulous ears like bloodhounds. There are camels of huge size, which like the mules and asses amble along without any art or training of men. There are no wolves nor deer nor hinds nor other like animals in this island. One finds here plenty of wild sheep, which have the hair of a deer and run in the country like wild animals. Many venomous creatures are found in the island, ns vipers, seipents, adders, lizards, scorpions, basilisks and other such beasts in great abundance. There is a kind of apple which they call the apple of Paradise, of a wonderful form. There are likewise trees of which the leaves are four palms in breadth, and reach in height the stature of a man. In the fruit which these trees bear there are many seeds and pips, more than a hundred of them, which are long and large as a finger. These trees last only three years, and others spring from their roots. In Cyprus the water of the springs is such that let a man drink of it as much as he will it never does him harm. There are several rivers which water this same island. The conntry is very pestilential, especially in summer time on account of the great heat, and also of the

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