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CLAUDE DELAVAL COBHAM
Exerpta Cypria
page 91

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The whole Turkish fleet was composed of 400 sail, to wit 160 galleys, half of which were in excellent order, with musketeers, artillery and combatants, not less than 100 men to a galley. The other half was made up of vessels badly supplied with men and guns, and many of them were old galleys. Of galliots, faste and brigantini di essenti there were 60, all well manned. I could not say if there were more large or small vessels, but the whole number of ships with oars was 200. The rest were sailing ships, caramussoli, 3 ships of Venetian build, 6 lighters, 6 mortar boats and many frigates to make up the total of four hundred. They had 4000, report said even 10,000 horses, counting mares and a large number of mules saddled and used as horses. The horses were carried on the large and small ships, the lighters and mortar boats: each galley also carried two. There were altogether 6000 janissaries: the whole force, including janissaries aud cavalry, which was landed in two separate bodies for the siege of Nicosia, made up 100,000 men. The fleet never landed any of the crews of the galleys until they saw that our navy was too weak to molest them: nor did Mustafa Pasha bring up reinforcements for the attacks until Piali Pasha sent up men from the fleet under Ali Pasha : Τ cannot say how many, the Turks said 25,000, but I do not think there were so many. As soon as these arrived they renewed the vigour of their assaults. Mustafa, the General of the expedition, many and many a time, not only by messengers bnt by letters fired into the city on arrows, made our chiefs understand that they innst surrender : he did not desire their ruin, only their submission ; their goods he wonld leave them to enjoy. But they would never consent. As soon as Nicosia was taken AH Pasha returned at once with his men to the fleet, which sailed for the gardens of Famagosta. The army marched to besiege this city, and the ships remained there until news arrived that onr fleet had reached Castel Ruzzo to engage the Turkish fleet in Cyprus. On hearing this Piali and Ali landed at once and came to the tent of Mustafa Pasha, where they consulted as to what should be done. It was rumoured that Piali was afraid of losing his ships, for he had heard that the junction of the different squadrons had mode our fleet extremely strong; and although they were well aware of the great losses they knew thoroughly all the movements of onr ships, and were even aware of a dispute between Italians and Greeks at Canea, which made them fancy that we had taken recruits at Candia, especially archers, a force they esteem highly. They adopted however the advice of Mustafa, who insisted that the dignity and power of the Grand Signor would not allow them to refuse battle: they must go bravely on, and God was with them. Whereon they landed all tho Christians and useless folk, and equipped their galleys with good nrtillery and fighting men. The whole fleet of oared vessels advanced to Liiniso; the caramussolini, sailing ships, lighters aud mortar boats remaining at their anchorage off the gardens of Famagosta. Two galleys were sent to Cape Santepilani nnd beyond to descry and give warning of onr fleet All these details I learned from the Turks themselves while I was a prisoner with the forces of Mustafa. As soon as they heard of the retreat of our fleet they came back making great demonstrations of joy, and embarking the slaves and the rest of their baggage sailed away on the sixth of October. L do not know whither, bnt it was said that Piali Pasha went with the galleys to Constantinople and Ali with his to Rhodes. The greater part of the slaves, male and female, were taken off the island. The flower of the youth, with much rich spoil, was embarked on a galleon of Mohammed Pasha, and on a caramosolin and a galley destined as presents to the Grand Signor and to Mehmed Pasha. Bnt one of these ladies set fire to the ammunition, which blew up with the galleon, the caramosolin and the galley, aud all the persons and stores on board, except the captain, the clerk and some others in; EXCERPTA CYPRIA.

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