HISTORY ETHNOGRAPHY NATURE WINE-MAKING SITE MAP
Selected and rare materials, excerpts and observations from ancient, medieval and contemporary authors, travelers and researchers about Cyprus.
 
 
 
 
uses Google technology and indexes only and selectively internet - libraries having books with free public access
 
  Previous Next  

CLAUDE DELAVAL COBHAM
Exerpta Cypria
page 103

View PDF version of this page

DI E DO. PA RUTA. 9Γ service might upon all occasions be expected. Nor were there any Horse in the Kingdom for action, save 500 Stmdiofti which were still kept in pay, nnr was it easic to get more, for though many of the nobles who enjoyed several things from the Camera Reate, some through antient, some through new privileges, were bound to find by those their Fee-farms three or four horses a piece for the Prince's sen-ice, and that these amounted to about 700 horses, yet were there not many more than 100 of them that were serviceable at this time. Nay, the breed of horses was very much decayed throughout the whole island, by reason of the greater conveniency which the inhabitants found hi riding upon mules, whereof this country prodiieeth great abundance, and those very large. Things were therefore in a very bad posture, since there wanted sufficient forces to withstand so powerful an enemy who were masters of the field : nor could they long maintain two Forts, whereof Nicossia being one, by reason of the largeness thereof required a great many souhliers to defend it; and the other which was Famagosta, though it was lesser was so vteak and imperfect as it likewise required many men, and those valiant ones too, to make good the defects of the Fort. And though these forces were but small yet were tohey of lesser use for want of experienced commanders : for there was not anyone in the whole island of quality or condition save Astore Baglione, who was general of that Militia, Martinengo being dead at sea as hath been said. Nor was there any Commissary (renerai of the island, nor any Venetian magistrate, as is usually had in all places in times of danger ; for Lorenzo Bembo, who held that place, was dead but a little before, in whose place though the Senate soon chose Sebastian Yeniero, Commissary of Corfu, yet could he not come so soon to Cyprus to execute his office. The chief commands of war were therefore conferred upon divers Cyprian gentlemen, who were of great wealth and nobility, and very well affected towards the commonwealth, but of very little or no experience at all in the'Militia, and therefore the less fit for such employment. Count Rocas was made Baglione's Lieutenant, who after Bembo's death held supream authority in all things belonging to the Militia. Giacomo di Nore^, Count of Tripoli, was master of the artillery; Giovanni Singlitico, Captain of all the horse of the kingdom, Giovanni Sosomcno, Captain of the Pioniers, Scipione Caraffa and Pietro Paolo Singlitico, Captains of the country people, who were to be placed in strong situations upon the mountains ; and so other offices and employments were disposed of to others. And the received opinion being that the Turks would first assault Famagosta, Baglione would go to the custody thereof himself, that he might use his endeavours where there shonld be most need. Things being thus ordered, after many consultations it was concluded, that the first thing they wonld do should be by all possible means to hinder the enemy from landing; or at least to infest them, keeping along the shore whither they should seem to come, so as they should be enforced to separate and change their station, by that means prolonging the business since they could not tarry long upon those downs without danger, where there was no harbour for their fleet: according to which advice as soon as they heard news of the enemy's approach, Count Rocas parted from Nicossia with three hundred horse, which was all that in so great haste could be got together, and with one hundred dragoons, commanded by Antonio dal Beretino and Lazzaro Cocopani, and marched towards the place which was designed for mustering all the Horse, which was a fitting place for that purpose, not far from the shores of the Saline where it was thought the enemy's fleet would land their men, because there was the best anchoring, and for tha-t it was nearest the two chiefest cities, Nicossia and Famagosta. Baglione went also from Famagosta with 300 dragoons and 150 sfrattiottì. l-*ietro Ronoadi, who was Governor of the Albanese Militia, going at the same time from Baffo, with the rest of the cavalry; which being all met they resolved not to advance any further, nor to attempt anything, but c. I«

View PDF version of this page


  Previous First Next  
 
 
 
 
 
Our banners   Bibliography   Global Folio
All materials from this site are permitted for non commersial use unless otherwise indicated.
If you reduplicate documents from here you have to indicate Cyprus Explorer as a source and place link to us.
Created at June 2008
              Яндекс.Метрика