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CLAUDE DELAVAL COBHAM
Exerpta Cypria
page 105

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PAKUTA. !»9 in of strongholds, than was the art or industry of Christians in erecting or in defending them. That their great train of artillery J the infinite number of their Pioners, and their experience in such things, would facilitate their throwing down the walls of Nicossia, and the bringing of their valiant souldiers to an assault; wherein being to meet with but little resistance, by reason of the paucity and pusillanimity of the defendants; it was not to be doubted but that the victory would fall into their hands, with as much, nay peradventure with more easiness than they could hope for of Famagosta, but certainly with much greater rewards, and more worth their labour and hazard. For filiese reasons, and out of the respect born to Mustafa's authority they resolved to attempt Nicossia first, towards which the whole Camp moved the 22 of -July, having sent five hundred Horse towards Famagosta, to hinder commerce between those two cities. AH this while the Cavalry lay idle in Nicossia, leaving the whole country open and free to be pillaged by the enemy, though Cavalier Roncadi, and soma other Gentlemen of the City, did often earnestly desire that they might go out, and shew themselves to the enemy, to keep them from growing the bolder, by reason of these the Nicossians' too timorous, and peradventure too cowardly counsells. But those who had the Government of affairs, not thinking it fit to hazard those men who were intended for the defence of the City, would by no means be brought to give way thereunto. Yet being more moved by the offences of their own men than by- those of the enemy, when they heard of the rebellion of Lefcara's family, which had not onely suddenly come in to Mustafa, but committing other ontrages to the prejudice of those of the City, had sent some of their men to persuade other Citizens, who had retired themselves to certain narrow passages amidst the mountains, and were free from being injured by the Turks, that following their example, they should discend into the plains, and submit willingly unto the Turks, it was resolved one night to send out 100 Horse and 400 Foot to fire that hamlet, whereof almost all the inhabitants, to the number of above 400 were put to the sword. Thus their treachery was severely punisht, and by the terrer thereof, the desire of novelty was curb'd in many of the inhabitants, by reason of the slavery wherein they were, for the aforesaid causes, so as it was clearly seen, that hoping by change of government to change their fortune, they were not onely not likely to oppose the enemy, but rather to afford them all convenieucy; which inclination of theirs Mustafa sought by all possible means to nourish, making many presents, and greater promises to such as should come in unto him. But the Turks pursuing their way without any obstacle, drew near the walls of Nicossia, and as soon as t>he Army was discovered by those that were within the town, they were all possest with infinite fear. Nicolo Dandolo was then Governor of that City, being made Lieutenant thereof by the Common-wealth, a man of weak judgement to manage so weighty a businesse, but who had that preferment put upon him, out of an opinion conceived, that though he was not very quick witted, yet he was good at action, by reason of the experience which he was believed to have gotten in se ver all imployments at sea. He having either lost his understanding through the extraordinary apprehension of danger, or not knowing through his want of reason and understanding, how to proride against so great an exigency, increased the difficulties and danger: for when the enemies' fleet was arrived, he had not got the ditches to be fully emptied, nor ordered the Militia, nor those of the country, nor provided for sufficient victualls for the City. To amend which disorders he was forced to commit greater; a publick Edict was made, that it should be lawfnll for every one to take corn wheresoever they could finde it, which being brought into the City, should be understood to be their own, which being too late a remedy, could not work the effect which was expected ; a good part thereof being left abroad in the country houses, with a double 13—2

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