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CLAUDE DELAVAL COBHAM
Exerpta Cypria
page 109

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PARUT Α. 103 were come with their trenches very near the ditch, and by frequent musqnet shot, playing npon those that were upon the walls, kept them from appearing upon the parapets. Moreover, they planted diverse great pieces towards the City, on St. Manna's side, whereby they did much prejudice to the houses, not without great fear unto the people. But that which gave the commanders jnstest cause of fear, was, their stupendous earth works, which being made with great art and expedition, several! forts were seen within a few daies, to be raised to such a height-, as the enemies standing upon them, might fight securely,and upon great advantage; aud make use, not onely of their artillery against onr men, bnt of their arrows, and artificial! fire-works, which being thrown over the walls, and fastning upon wool-sacks, whereof the traverses were made, destroyed those works, depriving those within uf those defences. The difficulty grew the greater to the defendants, fur that being bnt a few, they could hardly supply the duties, which the defence of so many places required ; so as they were forced to keep from sending people abroad to molest the enemy, lest they might add to their own difficulties. Their chief hope lay iu their artilleiy, which being well managed, did disturb the enemies works; Antonio dal Beretiuo, a witty man, and a well experienced canonier, did much good thereby to those of the town. But the City soon lost him, and many others, who were well verst in that affair; for being shot by the enemies, wherennto they were continually exposed, most of them were slain. So as the Turks brought on their trenches so far, as they came to the connterscarfe, wherein making some breaches, they at last entred the ditch ; and having thereby made rampiers of earth, whereby to defend themselves from the enemies shot, they began to undermine the bnlworks with their mat-hooks, so as they soon made stairs, whereby they might the more easily mount the bnlworks; and climbing np thereby, they began to make some little assaults upon the bid works, Costanzo and Podoeataro, (which were so called, from the families of such gentlemen, as had had a particular care iu building the Fort) tu see, how they that were within would behave themselves. And so it fell out, as those who were upon the defence of Costanzo, being surprised at unawares, suffered themselves to be so charged, as many of the Turks advancing very boldly, got beyond the parapets, but Paolo dal Guasto and Andrea da Spelle, falling npon them with their companies, the enemies were repulst, much to their prejudice ; but not without the losse of many of onr men, particularly of Andrea who fighting valiantly amongst the foremost, was slain. Tins unexpected assault did so terrifie the defendants, as many thought, that if the Turks had seconded the first assailants with greater forces, the City would have been lost. But the eschewing of this danger gave them no better hopes, for they could find no way to disturb the Turks works, who labouring continually in the making of, as it were, severa 11 cawseys of earth, twenty five foot broad, which reached from their trenches to the breaches, which (as hath been said) was made in the co un ter scarf ; and sheltring those waies on the sides, with faggots, and baskets fill'd with earth, they prepared for greater, aud more secure assaults ; which if they were not timely opposed, there was no way of safety left. So as though it was a hard and dubious thing, to expose the best of their few good souldiers to so great danger; yet no better exigency appearing, they resolved npon that course at last, which had been severall times before refused. Cesare Piovene, an Italian, Count Rocas his Lieutenant, sallied therefore out of the town, with part uf the Italian foot, and with the horse, intending to fight the enemies trenches, and their forts, to clog their artillery, and to destroy, or at least to do what mischief he could to their works, which resolution was very welcome to the souldiers, who were impatient to see themselves daily \vasted, and the utmost of dangers to draw nigh, without making any triall of themselves, or taking revenge upon the eneinie. But this generous action, being perhaps too lately attempted, was then too

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