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CLAUDE DELAVAL COBHAM
Exerpta Cypria
page 110

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precipitously punned, wrought not the good effect which was hoped for nor which the happy beginning promised ; wherein Piovine boldly advancing, took two of the enemies forts, and slew almost all that were within them; who being sweltred with the extreara heat, (for it was at full noon when onr men assaulted them) and being free from any apprehension, had laid aside their arms and were fallen asleep. But Viovone's souldiers, according to the abusive custom of our militia, gave over pursuing the victory, and fell to pillage; which disorder became afterwards the greater, because the Grecians and Albaneses having tuo early advanced with their horse, to assault the enemies trenches; were it either, for that vying with the Italians for valour, they would be the first that should appear in that action; or that they were not well pleased to be commanded by Piovene; they, by this their unseasonable haste, made those of the camp too soon acquainted with their comming, so as many Turks hasting thither, they easily made our men run, who were divided, and busied about plunder. But Piovene together with Count Alberto and JOVBU Battista da Fano tarrying with some few of their men, to defend the fort which they had taken after a long and stout withstanding, the enemies comming still in, in great numbers, were out in pieces. These valiant men were encouraged to make this defence out of hopes of being soon assisted by those from within, the usual! signe of succour being already given between them. But because the Turks, who upon the notice of onr mens comming ont, were assembled together in great numbers, and making use of this occasion, prepared to assault the hulwork Costanzo, as they did afterwards; Count Tripoli, who had the keeping thereof, was fore'd to stay Captain Gregorio Panteo, who was appointed to go forth with the relief, that he might make use of him, and of his men, against the enemies unexpected assault; who not being able, after a long dispute, to mount the parapets, wore forced to retreat. Thus the Turks continued many daies to annoy those within, by severall waies, and to attempt the taking of the City, though but with triviali assault*. Wherefore by reason of the paucity of the defendants, our forces were much lessened, which could not well discharge all the duties which were to be done, both by day and night, in severall parts of the City. The parapets of the bulworks were already very much weakened, and in some plaees wholly cast down, by the enemies continuali shot ; so as great diligence was used to fill up those parapets with earth, and to finish the in works, where they were imperfect, and to erect some eavaluers for more security npon the bulworks. But these works proceeded on but slowly ; for the Pioners, wearied with watching, and other hardships, grow hot able to perform their work; and because the enemies artillery which were levelled by day, shot also by night, and did much harm. Yet the souldiers, especially the Italians, and the gentry of the City, continued stedfast in their resolution to defend themselves to the very last, being a little comforted with hopes that the Venetian fleet would soon come, and raise the siege. No answer was therefore given to divers letters, which were conveyed by the Turks into the City, by arrowes, wherein the Bashaw Mustafa writing, sometimes to the goveniours, sometimes to certain of the chief nobility of the City, and sometimes to the people in generali, exhorted them to yield, promising, in case they wonld do so, to use great liberality and humanity towards them ; and denouncing severe punish-ment, if they should doe otherwise. But finding that they could not learn any thing of the people's, nor of the govemour's intention by this means ; t hey made signs of parley to those of the bulwork of Constanze ; and having free liberty given them to do so, they in the name of the Bashaw Mustafa, said, M That he wondered very much that he had received no answer " to any of his letters, as if Iiis forces were despised, which were notwithstanding such, as he " might have ended the war much sooner by them, had he nut had regard to their safeties, " which they themselves seemed to slight so much. Iliat therefore he had thought good to iU4 EXCERPTA CYPRIA.

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