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CLAUDE DELAVAL COBHAM
Exerpta Cypria
page 119

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l'AHUTA. Ill devoted themselves t» strengthening the parapets, preparing shelters, making new platforms and repairing the u'd. Tliey threw all their strength and skill into their work : every hour had its toil, every iay showed new improvements, new designs. They kept reinforcing their 1 latteries with nev guns cast on the spot, and the whole was transported to that part of the wall« where the/ expected the attack. This was the special charge of Luigi Martinengo, Captain Gener ' of the artillery, under whom were six other chiefs in command of the force of B'ombardie-s : the order throughout being perfect. They prepared also fireworks to he nsea in varicus ways. The makers were skilled in these devices, which did good service. That they night not have to contend at the same time with the enemy and with inconveniences within, they expelled from the city all the useless mouths, perhaps eight thousand in all, who .vent to the villages without interference from the Turks. They next took α census of those vho remained within the walls and found seven thousand able-bodied men, viz. three thoisand five bundled Italian infantry, the rest being Greeks enrolled for service, some front the town, some from the country, men who earned in the siege an honourable name for loyalty md courage. The hope of fame and of ample reward WHS always present to inspirit their-i in their defence, Mare'Antoniu Biigadino, the Captain or Governor General of Famagosta, ising great and praiseworthy diligence in tins as in every other matter. Seeing the dauejer increase as the enemy drew nearer to the walls, lîragadino endeavoured with spirited speeches to establish the courage of the besieged, showing them that the time was come for them to make signal proof of that true valour to which for months past he had seen them inclined. No glory that warriors had earned in our age was greater than that which was reserved for them, in defending against the might of the Ottoman Empire a fortress so far from other Christian lands, and iu preserving with it α flourishing kingdom from enslavement by barbarians. Addressing himself to the Italian troops, he said—" Why, my brave comrades, have you conn; here from a far distant country, exposing yourselves to certain hardships and great danger in so long a voyage, if not to give fitting proof of your courage, and by surpassing merit to earn the supreme honours of warfare. Now indeed the very chance which you haviî so eagerly desired is put before yon. Your endnranee, your diligence, in short all the martial virtues have here the widest and noblest field: for this city is assailed and encompassed by foes of great repute, and the result of this siege is watched throughout the world with the greatest anxiety. But my confidence in yon, citizens and others who are enrolled among our troops, is no less great; for you have given clear proof not only of loyalty and constancy, but of time courage, in performing with the zeal and skill of tried soldiers all your military duties. Yonr generous hearts will never allow that in the defence of what is yonr own, your wives, yonr children, your goods, others shall take the lead. With noble emulation each man will seek to have a larger share in the toil, to be the first to expose hinuUlf to peril. Do not let the enemy's numbers frighten you for a moment. They are certfejmy less than what we hear by report, or than what is indicated by a pompous array of empty tents. Most of them, or at least the bravest of them, are exhausted by toil, or have returned home to enjoy the riches acquired in the siege of Nicossia. What happened in that city should wake in yon vigilance rather than alarm, for we know certainly that it was not the Valour or industry of the enemy which gave them the victory, but the negligence of the besieged, who appear to have thought that walls alone, not the stout hearts of men, are the bulwarks of cities. The liope of the succour which we expect at once might give courage evei\ to cowards, yet I would not have one of yon fix your thoughts on this, lest it should deti-act from yonr daring somewhat of praise, for it is on yourselves that each man must

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