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CLAUDE DELAVAL COBHAM
Exerpta Cypria
page 122

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for courage, and recalling their brave exploits, and the piaist» and liooty which had rewarded them, pointed out what hopes were theirs of still gi-eater things. Here he threatened the most terrible punishments for cowardice : there he promised the highest honours and prizes for valonr: he pictured to thein the booty and spoils, reminded them of the whole regiment* enriched by the sack of Nicusia, and prayed and implored thein to bring no shame on troops so lately victorious, to feel no fear before the arms of men to wlium they had always been a terror. Ho reminded them of their successes at Nicosia, and showed them that with equal ease, though with richer fruit, they could achieve another glorions victory, and end the war. Their opponents were the same men, nnwarlike or untried : they too were the same, rich in memories of old prowess which had won them the glorinns title of conquerors of the uarth. No enterprise on which they had embarked but had been crowned with success; from them the world had learned that the fortune of war bows to valour in arms. With these and like words the Pasha greatly cheered the troops, and then prepared to assist in person at the assault. He wished to see what was doing, and to be seen by his men : to help them with his counsel, and enconrage them with his presence. The attack was truly terrible. The Tnrka tfcirgVt stoutly, inflamed *by tU ΐίϊ·*ίη hope of that day gaining the city. Onr men kepi well together, and held their ground witii utS1^?*;? .CPHlrl^e. ''Tut enemy might enter their < Îefcnces, but could not drive out the defenders, as fast- as the Turks approached they were scattered, killed, hurled back: and blows which fell on so dense a crowd never fell in vain. This third attack continued for five hours, and was most bravely met. But the sold iers who were set to defend the ravelin at the Limisso gate were thrown into disoitler by ti le enemy's fireworks, and were unable to manœuvre in the small space they could command, so that when at the other points assailed by the enemy the battle was well nigh done, thjey were still engaged, and suffering very severe losses. They gave way at last, and allowed the Turks to scale the ravelin, and then, every other resource failing them, the commandera took the terrible and fatal, though necessary, resolve at once to fire a mine whieh they had prepared against this last dread emergency. On the ravelin stood crowded together soldiers from the enemy's camp and from the city, those charging, these retreating, and in a moment:foes and friends were covered with the ruins, "in one red burial blent." The ravelin lost, there remained between liesiegers and besieged only the breadth of the second line of defence, constructed, as we said, of casks and sacks full of earth. The men on either siile often talked together and, as soldiers use, flouted one another, the Turks deriding the vain hopes of our men, and telling them that the Christian fleets had by this time fled as far as Venice. Ours, in turn, mocked the enemy who, more like peasants than warriors, trusted so little in their arms that they used spades and shovels. With this raillery was mingled more serious discourse, for the Turks, through some slaves, made proposals for a truce. They had before made many attempts of the saine kind by letters addressed sometimes to the chiefs, sometimes to the people of the city, which they sent in upon arrows; bnt no reply was given to them, nur would the besieged ever agree tu parley, and when they found the-treacherous devices with which, under the guise of good faith, they threatened onr people fail, they betook themselves again to aims, and prepared another attack from the ravelin which was now in their hands. Another engagement followed, in which both sides fought desperately. But the greater glory remained with the besieged, especially with their commanders. Baglione himself, full of daring aud more by example than by words, urged his soldiers to fight, nnd always among the first he pressed on so far that with his own hands he tore from a Turkish standard-bearer a flag, taken in the siege of Nicosia, on which were blazoned the arms of Venice. Luigi Martinengo, who was especially charged with the 114 EXCERPTA CYPRIA.

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