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CLAUDE DELAVAL COBHAM
Exerpta Cypria
page 125

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PAR UTA. 117 all their property; fire pieces of artillery and three horses belonging to the three chief commanders were specially named. That all the inhabitants should in like manner he free to move with their families and property whither they would, but those who remained should be safe in their persons, their property and their honour from the insolence of the troop's. Tims in a single day the conditions of surrender won* discussed, arranged and ratified. The Turks appeared to wish to carry them out quickly and strictly, and sent at once into the harbonr about forty vessels, npon which the sick and wounded were first embarked, while the able-bodied soldiers kept their poste ou the second Hue of defence, and allowed the Turks to make no forward movement. But as soon as our men got beyond the trenches, and sa*, and were seen by, the enemy's host, it would be difficult to describe the wonder begotten by causes altogether different in one and the other army. Our men were staggered at the prodigious number of the force they saw in the Turkish camp. For over three miles from the city it stretched over a vast circuit, and was everywhere so full of troops that the turbans, which on every side showed white above the trenches, covered the ground like snow-flakes. The Turks, on the other hand, when they saw the defending force so small in numbers, the emaciated bodies and pale faces of our soldiers, who seemed as thongh they could hardly stand, mnch less offer so long and gallant a resistance to a foe, marvelled at their courage, and felt some touch of shame. They let natural pity, and the generous workings of trne courage, have their way ; they began to offer them refreshments, to speak courteously, to praise their steadfastness, and to encourage them to hope for the best. Meanwhile the Greeks and Alb»'»»"* were ready to embark with their families, and other detachments of soldiers wer? already on board other vessels, so that on the fourth of August the city was left free to th.e Turks. As soon as they entered they began to use all kinds of violence towards the citizen Bragadino informed Mustafa of this, and complained, and prayed that he would show thai ue observed the conditions, and respected his plighted faith, by putting some check on tin? insolence of his soldiery. He begged that more ships might be sent to take the rest of the' people, and promised that he would then come himself to bring him the keys of the city. This message was entrusted to Nestore Martinengo, a youth of great spirit, who from the iHpginuiiig of the war had served in Faniagnsta under the banner of his micie Girolamo MartiniH'fir*'» an^ had been employed on various duties, always earning high praise for his intelliger ce ant^ coniuge. He went to the Pasha, and obtained forthwith an order to the soldiers win' had entered the city to abstain from all violence, and a promise that two other vessels sin '"Id be sent at once into the harbour to embark our soldierS. He was desired to tell lin igadino that Mustafa would be glad to see him : he wished to know in person and face t 11 face a nia11 of whose great worth he had had such proof, and to whose valour he woulc L everywhere warmly testify. Without further delay, on the ev1 Piling of the same day, leaving Tiepolo in the city, all the other principal officers, to wit, Ï tragadiuu, Baglione, Martinengo and Antonio Qnirini, a noble "Venetian, accompanied by ot her captains and a few Greek gentlemen, went ont on horseback, attended by forty musket I fere on foot. The General Bragadino rode in front of the rest under a red niubrella, dress' «I purple with the ordinary robes of his office, and followed by the others named. "Whc, 11 they arrived at the pavilion of the Pasha they were received with great ceremony, and, ' their arms being laid aside, they were introduced into the presence of Mustafa. He cunvt' rsed with them for some time on various matters, dis-sembling his inmost thoughts. But 1 laat> trying to find some pretext for giving effect to the savagery which his fierce spiriti bod conceived, he required some guarantee that the *s which he lent them would be «eu* back. Bragadino replied that he was not bound

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