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CLAUDE DELAVAL COBHAM
Exerpta Cypria
page 161

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OALEPIO. 153 Captain Bernardino of Gobio: Signor Hercole Malatesta, Captain Pietro Conte and other captains and ensigns were badly wounded by stones. The next night a frigate arrived from Candia winch brought news of sure and speedy help, and filled the city with delight aud courage. Under the orders of Captain Marco Crivelatore and Cav. Maggio shelters were constructed alongside all the breaches, and wherever they heard mines being dug, with casks and sacks full of moist earth, boxes and mattresses : the Greeks brought with great readiness all they had, for the sacking was used up, and they fetched chair-backs, curtains, carpets and even their sheets to make these sacks. This was an excellent and speedy way of restoring the parapets, which were destroyed by the furious and unceasing cannonade. What was battered during the day was repaired during the night : the soldiers took no sleep, and stood always on the walls, visited constantly by their officers, who slept only during the hottest hours of the day, the only time they had for rest, for the enemy kept calling every moment "to anus," so as to leave ns no breathing space. Second Assalili. On June 29 they fired the mine made in the stonework of the ravelin, which shattered everything, and did immense damage, allowing an easy ascent to the enemy who came up to the top with a fniions charge, M nstafa being present throughout. The attack was checked at once by Count Hercole and his company, and so the Turks were driven back liy onr men who fought in the open, the parapet having been destroyed by the mine. On our side there fell Captain Meani, sergeant-major, Captain Celio, a grenadier, and Captain Erasmo da Ferino : Captain Soldetello, Antonio de Ascoli, Captain Gioan d'Istria, with many ensigns and officers were wounded, and abont thirty soldiers killed. At the Arsenal, where they were repulsed, the enemy's loss was greater still, and ours less: five only were killed, of whom was Captain Giacomo dn Fabria. The following night a slave came in who told m* that two thousand six hundred Turks were dead, two being men of rank. The assault lasted six horn's, and the Right Reverend Bishop of Limissu, with the cross, stood there cheering onr soldiers : and so he did in all the attacks, and if in any one this prelate was not present, the enemy were likely to prevail. He wa# a brother of the order of S. Dominic, a native of Famagosta. In these troubles he showed himself very zealous for the faith, going often to the walls and giving soup and other food to the soldiers, making these and the citizens with them often confess and communicate, and inspired snob hatred in the Turks that when they entered the city the Pasha caused him to be sought for diligently, with intent to torture him, but a little before a musket boll had sent him to η better life. His name was Frate SerarKno Fortebrazza, of Milan. In this attack there were brave women who came with arms and stones and water to help the soldiers. The enemy seeing what great losses they had sustained in these two attacks changed their plans, and with increased fury began again to battei1 onr defences and shelters on every side with their cannon. They worked away more actively than ever, cou-stmcted seven more fort« nearer the city, brought up the guns from the more distant forts, and monnted eighty others. Their fire was so brisk that on the day and night of July 8 five thousand shots were counted, doing such damage to our parapets that for all our toil we could scarcely repair them, because onr labourers were now few in number, and worked under a boil of musket bolls: the shelter behind the ravelin was broken np by shots mid mines, so as to leave no platform, because we too were strengthening the parapets from within, and encroaching on the platform, which we were obliged to lengthen with planks. Captain Maggio constructed a mine under this ravelin, so that when we conld hold it no longer, we might in abandoning it to tho enemy inflict on him some signal damage. on

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