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CLAUDE DELAVAL COBHAM
Exerpta Cypria
page 163

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a bad smell ; this they heaped up before the gate, lighted it, and so with faggots and pitched beams they worked np so fierce a fire that it was impossible to extinguish it, though the Christians kept throwing cnsks full uf water from the high cavalier, which burst over the fire. Onr men, by reason of the great heat and the stench, were forced to retire into the city. The Turks went down and dug fresh mines at the sides. We closed the gate which could no longer be kept open, and straightway to the surprise of all they re-made the platform of the ravelin and planted a gnu over against the gate, which onr men had entirely earthed up with stones, soil and other material. The position of the city was now desperate; within the walls everything was lacking except hope, the valour of the commanders, the daring of the soldiers. The wine Avas exhausted, neither fresh nor salted meat nor cheese could be had, exeept at extravagant prices. The horses, asses, and cats were consumed. There Avas nothing to eat bnt bread and beans, nothing to drink bnt vinegar and water, and this too soon failed. The digging of three mines was heard below in the cavalier of the gate: everywhere the enemy was toiling with more activity than ever : in the ditch opposite the battery of the curtain they kept heaping np a mound of earth as high as the Avail, and before long they reached the Avail of the counterscarp: opposite the great tower of the Arsenal they constructed a cavalier, all strengthened Avithont ααΉΙι cables, as high as that of the city. Within the walls were left about five hundred Italian soldiers, sound, bnt worn with long watches and the toil of fighting under the blazing snn : the most and best of the Greeks were dead, and about July 20 the chief men of Famagosta resolved to write to Signor Bragadino, entreating him that now the fortress was rednced to snch a pass, its defenders gone, its supplies spent, witli no hope of assistance—since they had sacrificed their lives and goods in pursuit of their safety and their allegiance to the Republic—he would agree to terms of honourable surrender, Avith dne regard to the honour of their AVIANS, and the lives of their children, AA'ho Avonld be left in the enemy's clutches : witness the signal lesson of Nicosia, and the help the government gave there. Bragadino ansAvered with words of consolation and encouragement, promising that help Avould come: allaying, as far as he could, the general terror that preA-ailed, and sending a frigate to Cnndia to announce the straits they Avere in. The Turks had finished their mines, and fired them on July 29. In the meanwhile the defenders had been trying as usual to restore the parapets which the cannonade had shattered, and as there Avas no other material left the sacks Avero made of carisea nnder the superintendence of the Captain of Baffo. The three mines of the cavalier did great damage, throAving down the greater portion of the Avork, and killing the Governor Rondaci» della Stratia. The mine at the Arsenal shattered the rest of the great tower, killing nearly a whole company of onr soldiers : only the bases of the tAvo flanks remained Avhole. Fifth Assault. The enemy strove to take these tAvo flanks, and to monnt on the other batteries : the attack lasted from the tAventieth hour until night, and A'ery many Turks Avere killed. In this fight and others Signor Giacomo Strambali, a Cypriot noble, showed great valour, as well as Tutio Podochatoro, a Cypriot noble, Avho died bravely : his brother Alessandro, your brother Gioan Filippo Lnsignano, and others of onr nobles did their dnty as knights, and with natural exasperation, for they had seen the slaughter at Nicosia. Your poor brother died eight days before the surrender of the city. May God give him Paradise. 20—2 CALEPIO. 155

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