HISTORY ETHNOGRAPHY NATURE WINE-MAKING SITE MAP
Selected and rare materials, excerpts and observations from ancient, medieval and contemporary authors, travelers and researchers about Cyprus.
 
 
 
 
uses Google technology and indexes only and selectively internet - libraries having books with free public access
 
  Previous Next  

CLAUDE DELAVAL COBHAM
Exerpta Cypria
page 164

View PDF version of this page

Sixth Assault. The next morning at dawn the city was attacked at all points. This assault lasted six hours, for the Tnrks fought with less spirit than usual. They kept giving us great trouble on the sea front with their galleys, moving out at every attack, and battering with their cannon every part of the city which they could reach. About three hundred Tnrks were killed, and abont a hundred Christians killed and wounded. The city was reduced to great straits, only seven barrels of powder were left; so the chiefs resolved to surrender under honourable conditions. On the morning of August I the enemy fired two hundred cannon shots, damaging greatly the parapet of the Limisso gate: they came up tu the place to reconnoitre, and a brisk skirmish followed. Rut wheu noon was passed a flag of truce was hoisted, and an envoy came from Mustafa Pasha, with whom it was agreed that the following morning two hostages should be given on either side while tho agreement was under discussion. By order of Signor Bragadino there went out as hostages on onr side Count Hercule Martinengo, and Signor Matteo Colti, a citizen of Famagosta, and from the enemy's camp there came into the city the lieutenants of Mustafa and of the Agha of the Janissaries, who were met at the gate by Signor Baglione with two hundred musketeers, while our officers were met by the Turks with a great array of cavalry and musketeers, accompanied by Mustafa's son in person, who welcomed them with great courtesy. Signor Baglione discussed the terms of capitulation with the Turkish hostages in the city. He asked for the lives of the defenders, their arms, their goods: five cannon, three of their finest horses, and α safe passage to Candia under an escort of galleys : that the townsfolk should stay in their houses and enjoy what was their own, li ring like Christians without any molestation therefor. The Turks accepted these conditions, to which Mustafa assented, and signed the truce. They forthwith sent galleys and sailing ships into the harbour, the soldiers began to embark, and when most of them were on board, the Christian chiefs and captains being anxious also to embark, on the morning uf August 5 Signor Bragadino sent out Count Nestor Martinengo with a letter tu Mustafa to say that the same evening he proposed to come out to see the Pasha, and tu hand to him the keys of the city, leaving Signor Tiepolo in charge of the fortress. He begged that during his absence nothing should be clone tu annoy the citizens, for up to this time Turks and Christians had maintained with each other friendly and trustful intercourse, iu all courtesy of deed and word, eating aud drinking together. Mustafa replied to the letter by desiring the Count to tell Signor Bragadino to come when he pleased: that he would gladly see him and know him better, for he recognised the great courage shown by Bragadino, his fellow-officers and brave soldiers, whom, wherever he was, he should never fail to praise. On no account, let them be assured, would he suffer any annoyance to be inflicted on the citizens. Count Nestor returned and reported accordingly. In the evening Signor Bragadino, accompanied by Signor Baglione, S. Alvise Martinengo, S. Gioan Antonio Querini, S. Andrea Bragadino, Car. dell1 Haste, Captain Carlo Ragonasco, Captain Francesco Stracco, Captain Hettor da Bressa, Captain Gierolaino di Sacile and other gentlemen, with fifty soldiers, went out : the officers wore their swords, the soldiers had muskets. So they went to Mustafa's tent, who at first received them courteously and made theui sit down. They passed from one subject to another, then a complaint arose that daring the truce Signor Bragadino had caused certain slaves to be put to death. There was not a word of truth in it, but Mustafa rising in anger would scarcely listen to what his visitors said, and ordered them to be bound. They were defenceless, for they were compelled to lay aside their arms before entering the tent, and thus bound were led one by one into the 156 EXCERPTA CYPRIA.

View PDF version of this page


  Previous First Next  
 
 
 
 
 
Our banners   Bibliography   Global Folio
All materials from this site are permitted for non commersial use unless otherwise indicated.
If you reduplicate documents from here you have to indicate Cyprus Explorer as a source and place link to us.
Created at June 2008
              Яндекс.Метрика