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CLAUDE DELAVAL COBHAM
Exerpta Cypria
page 215

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LITHGOW. SANDYS. 205 SANDYS. George Sandys, sou of Edwin, Archbishop of York, was born 1577 and died 1644. He published in small folio, London, 1615, A Relation of a Journey began Au. Dom. 1610. The first book deals with the Turkish Empire, ite marniere, forces etc.: the second with Egypt, the third witJi Palestine, and the fourth with the journey home from Acre, by Cyprus. Crete, Malta, Sicily and Italy. He does not make it at all dear that he landed in Cyprus, bnt he lias collected with diligence what was known in his time about the island, and his quaint narrative seems worthy of a place among onr Excerpta, From the number of early editions of the Relation it must have been very popular. We transcribe from Book iv. pp. 218—222 of the first edition. For Salamis see Velleiiis Paterculus 1.1, " Teucer, neu receptns a patre Telamone ob segnitiam non vindicatae fratria in juriae, Cyprmu adpnlans coguomiuem patriae suae Salamina coustitnit." Now shape we our course for England. Beloved Soile: as in site (Virg. Eel. I. 67.) "Wholly from all the world disjoyned," so in thy felicities. The summer burnes thee not, nor the winter benunis thee : defended by the sea from wastfnll incursions, and by the valour of thy sonnes from hostile invasions. All other countries are in some things defective, when thou a provident parent doest minister unto thine whatsoever is useful): forrein additions bnt only tending to vanity and luxury. Vertue in thee at the least is praised, and rices are branded with their names, if not pursued with punishments. That Ulysses (Horn. Od. I. 1.) "Who knew many mens manners, and-saw many cities," if as sound in judgement as ripe in experience, will confesse this to be the land that floweth with milk and honey. Our sailea now swelling with the first breath of May, on the right hand we left Cyprus, sacred of old unto Venus, who (as they fainp) was here first exhibited to mortals (Homer, in Hyinnis, V. 1—4.) I rang of Venus crownd with gold, renownd For faire: that Cyprns guards, by Neptune bound. Her in soft fonie mild-breathing Zephyre bore On murmuring waves unto that fruitfull shore. Thither said to be driven, in regard to the fertility of the soile, or beastly lnsts of the people, who, to purchase portions for their daughters, accustomed to prostitute them on the shore unto strangers ; an offering besides held acceptable to their goddesse of vicionsnesse. Some write that Cyprus was so named of the Cypres se trees that grow therein, others of Cyrus, who built in it the ancient city of Aphrodisia, but grossely, for Cyrus lived six hundred yea res after Homer, by whom it was so named: bnt moro probable of Crypt ns, the more ancient name, in that often concealed by the surges. It stretches from East into West in forme of a fleece, and thmsteth forth a number of promontories : whereupon it was called Cerastis, which signifieth horned ; so terming the promontories, as in Pliillis to Demophon (Or. Her. II. 131.) A bay there is like to a bow when bent Steepe bornes advancing on the shores extent, the occasion of that fable of Venus her metamorphosing the cruel sacrifices of that island into oxen; or else of the tumors that grew in many of their foreheads. It is in circuit,

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