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CLAUDE DELAVAL COBHAM
Exerpta Cypria
page 269

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the same kind two leagues tu the east of it, near a village called Gall!porno, it is a gallery with fuor apartments on each side, in most of which then- are holes cut domi like sepulchres, which are now filled up. On the hills above it, are some small ruins of an antient place, which might be Fiwiw, taken by Diogenes Poliorcetes, and I saw near the grot a great number of sepulchres cut into the rock, many of them being in the manner of graves, which seem to have had stone covers over them. Towards the west end of this promontory the mountains are very high, and the foot of them stretches out in snch a manner towards the north sea, that there is no passage on the north side of them; and, I suppose, that these hills were the bounds of the kingdom of Carpasia on the north west side ; those to the south west-being probably the low mountains, by which there is a narrow pass to the sea. Aphrodishtm was situated near the west part of the promontory, and probably on the shear to the north; it was abont nine miles from the territory of Salamis. From this grotto we returned again to Jalousa. On the eighteenth we travelled to the north west and came to Andronico., where part of the village are Turks, who are sometimes under such apprehensions of the Corsairs, that for security they go and lie on the mountains, and they told ine, that some of them have even perished with cold in those retreats. AVe afterwards came to a village of Turks, where oue of them holds his lands on the condition of entertaining strangers, and his people came and drew water for onr mules; this was in the road from the northern parts to Famagusta. From this place we went ont of the road northwards, near an hour to the mountains called Eskhertve; on the highest summit of which is the strong castle of the hundred chambers before mentioned, which is almost entire. AVe lay at a Christian village on the north side of the hill. Chap. IV. OF NICOSIA, GERINES, LAPTA, AKD SOLL On the nineteenth we travelled westward on the north side of the island, and came to a very pleasant village called Aga thou, situated at the beginning of the plain on the sea : there are a great number of cypress and orange trees abont it, and it is probable that Macaria was situated near this place. The plain is a very narrow strip of land not above α mile broad, but extends westward for about thirty miles, almost to the bay where these mountains end; I take this to have been the kingdom of Lapithia, and shall have occasion to make some observations on the supposed capital of it. On the 20th we pursued our journey, and ascending the lulls to the south, risiteli two small convents, and afterwards the monastery of Aittipitone»', it is famous for the Lignum Cyprinuin, of which there are seven trees, there being no others of that kind in the island. It is the oriental plane tree, and is engraved in this volume among the plants which 1 brought from the east. AYe crossed over the hill to the south, and came into the great plain between Famagusta and Nicosia, and lay at a Christian viHajge Marashoulou. On the twcnty-fii-st we travelled northwest to a village called Chyterea by the Franks, of which I have already given an account, and of the river there, which supplied the aqueduct at Salamis. From this place we travelled to the south west to Nicosia. 1 went to the house of the consul's broker, and was also recommended to the dragoman of the mosulcm ; both of them assisted me in seeing thnt city, which is towards the west end of the plain, and is supposed to be the old Tremitw, it is the capital of Cyprus, where the mosolem or governor resides; it is fortified with very large ramparts, but has no fossee, and consequently is a veiy indifferent fortification; the ramparts are faced with the hewn stone of the old walls; the circumference 88—2 POCOCKK.

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