HISTORY ETHNOGRAPHY NATURE WINE-MAKING SITE MAP
Selected and rare materials, excerpts and observations from ancient, medieval and contemporary authors, travelers and researchers about Cyprus.
 
 
 
 
uses Google technology and indexes only and selectively internet - libraries having books with free public access
 
  Previous Next  

CLAUDE DELAVAL COBHAM
Exerpta Cypria
page 300

View PDF version of this page

fine village, where there was formerly a comnianderie of the Knights Hospitallers. Lewis de Magnac, grand commander in Cyprus, "built, in this place, a plain, square, and strong tower, which still remains · the front exhibiting this appearance. It is about seventy feet high, and fifty-four feet broad, adorned with coats of arms; but the great gate is buried in some vile house, so that I could not see it: yet part of the convent, which has been large, is still to be seen. This place I take to be the Trota of the ancients, because a river runs between it and Piseopi, and Treta was situated east of a fine river. But I find it impossible to reconcile the ancient geography with what I saw, and what Τ may reasonably suppose from appearances and the traditions of the country. Piseopi is a beautiful large village, resembling those of Great Britain; the adjacent grounds are watered by an aqiueduct from the river; broken fusts lie scattered around, and some grand ruins are still visible. Here, or in the neighbourhood, was a nemus sacred to Apollo; and one of those ruins somewhat resembles a temple: the people say it was the palace of one who taught music; and, from this tradition, we may conjecture it was dedicated to Apollo; though, to me, it seems to have been the palace of the superior, or lord of the manor : for it evidently appears, that the buildings around it have been intended for the sugar works which were carried on in this place; and I could find neither figure nor inscription which might have ascertained the nature of the whole. Having proceeded some miles beyond this village, I entered the hilly country, exhibiting, for some way, nothing but bare recks towards the shore, which is bold ; but afterwards I found the ground covered with woods. In one place I saw the effects of an earthquake which happened a considerable time ago, and was seized with horrour at the sight. Vast profound chasms opened to my view; and, into these, huge, split rocks had been hurled:— Mountains, which were rent, seemed to gape to the very centre; while others, still more frightful, hung menacing, as in the very act of tumbling, with such an enormous weight as (one would think) might shake the earth to its foundation. Having viewed these «Tecks of nature with astonishment, I went forward to Livathi ; which stands upon the river Aphdiem, not far from what is at present called Capo Bianco; and here I find Arsinoe about two leagues north from this shore; yet we see it always laid down west of Paphos Antiqua : perhaps another of the same name may have stood in tliat situation, but now no vestige of it remains. This cape I suppose to be Phrurinm ; because it is the first we meet with to the westward of Curium, which has any considerable projection, and the rest are rather points than capes. Through cursed rocky roads, I passed the mountains about Pisouri, and then obtained a better view of a bluff head, which, according to my geographical system, ought to be Zephyria, though there is no Paphos nor river to the eastward, bnt Chapatomi to the west. Couclia I substitute in the place of Arsinoe npon the ancient charts, partly for the above reason, and partly because it is, at this day, known, and sometimes called by the name Palikythera. It is a charming place, and, from some fragments of antiquity, appears to have been of note ; or, according to the language of the country, a favourite of queen Aphrodite. If this is granted, then Lesata, or Mandraka, or both, must be Hieroeepia, Xero will answer exactly to the river on which that town was built. Let us now consider the celebrated Paphos, which, we are told, was built by Cinyras, King of Assyria, who had Adonis and others by Metherme, daughter of Pygmalion, King of Cyprus. Some say the founder was Paphos, son of Pygmalion, by the statue which Venus animated; and thence the island derived its name. "Ilia Paplmm genuit, de quo tenet insula nomeii." Ovid, Met. X, 297. 290 EXCERPTA CYPRIA.

View PDF version of this page


  Previous First Next  
 
 
 
 
 
Our banners   Bibliography   Global Folio
All materials from this site are permitted for non commersial use unless otherwise indicated.
If you reduplicate documents from here you have to indicate Cyprus Explorer as a source and place link to us.
Created at June 2008
              Яндекс.Метрика