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CLAUDE DELAVAL COBHAM
Exerpta Cypria
page 307

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DRUMMOND. 2ί»7 a little time, raised a large, noble, and well-fortified town, which, from the pleasantness of its situation, the rich produce of its soil, and the equitable laws which he had instituted, drew all the inhabitants from Apeia, which was left quite desolate, and soon allured the best men from every corner, who came to dwell under his paternal sway; so that he became moro opulent and powerful than all the neighbouring princes. In gratitude to the author of such felicity, he bestowed npou his infant city the appellation of Solos, which we may suppose it bore, without corruption, until the Italians got possession of the island, and converted it into Soglia, which has a more Italian termination. There- was one inevitable inconvenience which attended this concourse of people from different parts : the language became so proverbially corrupt, that to speak barbaronsly, and to speak like those of Solos, were deemed synonymous phrases; hence comes the word Solecism, rather than from the Soli, who settled in Cilicia I need not observe to you the absurdity of the old maps, in laying down the situation of this town, which had certainly a port:*and river. Had they placed it in a spot where there either is, or ever could have been a bay or harbour, I should have approved of the site, because agreeable to history, so far as relates to the port; but they have carried it into the district of Morfon, far from that which bears its name to this day; and represented it upon a place from whence a shallow beach extends a great way. I therefore presume to say, the port was near Sa tradì us, Clarius, or the river that runs between them, which probably, in those days, bore the name of the city. Morfon is a very cheerful place, about a league and a half from the sea, and its chnrch is the handsomest building of its kind in the whole island: the court is finely walled with hewn stone, about fourteen feet high, extending to two hundred and fifty-six feet on each side, with forty-five feet for cloysters, *vc. It was almost finished, in a kind of Italian taste, when the Turks conquered the island. The elevation of the front is the first and only instance of the improvement of their gout : but this was nipped in the bnd by the irruption of the barbarians, and they returned to their old manner. They have built a mean corridore in front, which has never been intended by the first architect, and is far from being of a piece with the rest ; but, from the projecting stones, I imagine, he designed a portico, which might have added to the beauty of the fabric.—Saint Mamas, to whom this church is dedicated, performed abundance of miracles while he lived upon earth, and even now affords daily matter for astonishment. AVTien alive, he either could not or would not [jay his kharaj, or poll-money, and the collectors were always restrained, by the operation of some preternatural power upon their bodies and spirits, from using him in the savage manner in which they treated others, who were deficient in their payments. The prince, being informed of this extraordinary circumstance, ordered him to be hunted out from the hollow rocks, caves, and gloomy woods in which he always lived, and brought into his presence; and Saint George and Saint Demetrius, hearing of his being taken, followed, overtook, and accompanied him in his captivity. During his journey to court, seeing a lion rush out of a thicket and seize a lamb, to the terror and astonishment of his guards, he ordered the beast to quit Iris prey, and his command was instantly obeyed by the lion, who fawned and wagged his tail, in token of submission. The good man, being tired with walking, took the lamb in his arms, and mounting the wild beast, rode forwards to court, to the amazement of all who saw him. He presented himself in this equipage to the king, who, being apprized of these cireumstetnees, accepted the lamb, generously remitted the kharaj he owed, and gave orders that the Saint should live without paying any tax for the future: thus favoured he came hither and built a little church, in which at his death his body was deposited. This is one way of telling his story, which is varied by every papa whom yon consult on the subject. As

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