HISTORY ETHNOGRAPHY NATURE WINE-MAKING SITE MAP
Selected and rare materials, excerpts and observations from ancient, medieval and contemporary authors, travelers and researchers about Cyprus.
 
 
 
 
uses Google technology and indexes only and selectively internet - libraries having books with free public access
 
  Previous Next  

CLAUDE DELAVAL COBHAM
Exerpta Cypria
page 318

View PDF version of this page

CONSTANTIUS. Constantins, Archbishop of Sinai, is known to ns only as the author of the Κνπ-μιάΐ Χαρύο-σ-α κάί ('πίτομαί, which was printed in 4to at Venice in 1819, at the end (pp. 125—154) of the Τίίρι,γραφη or Description of the famous Monastery of the Virgin of Kykko. He mentions a visit to Larnaca!; apparently during the revolt of Khalil Agha in 1766, but nowhere speaks of himself as a Cypriot. He •writes an affected Greek, and onr translation might well have pruned away more of Iiis pomposity and pleonasms. The work lias no independent value, but as it was circulated gratis among pilgrims to Kykko, it was probably for very many years the chief source from which Orthodox Cypriote drew their knowledge of the island'e history. A PLEASANT AND BRIEF GYPR1AD, Setting forth what in this happy island is most worthy to be remembered and described. The Archbishop of Sinai, who compiled it, gratefully offers and dedicates it to the chief ecclesiastical dignitaries, and worthy gentlemen, of Cyprus, on whom have been showered so many graces. History, a living and speaking voice, a herald that stirs and thrills, rings through tlte ages, showing as in one general picture the peculiarities of nations and places ; and thus, ever linking the past with the present, displays all that men in their generations have done for one another, and through one another. Cyprus, one of the largest islands of the Mediterranean sea, and the closest and largest of all those which lie near Asia, is situated in the 35th parallel of latitude, and 52nd of longitude. It is washed or encircled on the W. by the Pamphylian sea, on the S. by that of Egypt, on the E. by the Syrian, and on the N. by the Cilician sea. Its shape is that of a bull's hide set lengthways. Perhaps no other spot in the world has had so many names as the ancients gave to this island. Pliny gives a number of them, and others after him distinguish it by various and curious appellations, justifying each of thein by some characteristic. Some, for instance, called it Sphekeia, from the Sphekes who inhabited it : others Kerastia, from the bonis or narrow promontories which stretch into the sea : others Cypris, because it was selected to be the home of Aphrodite, and the ancients called Aphrodite Cypris : others from a hero Cypres, who is unknown however to our historians. Some from the abundance of Cypres or Copper, which was first found there : and lastly Cyprus, from the Cyprès, a plant of fame among the ancients, and still used by the peoples of Asia, This plant, whicli the Hebrews called Gopher, the Greeks Cyprès, the Arabs and Ottomans Kinà, still adorns the gardens of Cyprus, and makes them fragrant with its flowers. The women of the island deck themselves with bunches of this plant, as did those of the Hebrews, as Holy Scripture testifies. But of all these names which try to figure the character of Cyprus the truest and most fitting (albeit suiting and matching but ill with its present condition) is that of Macaria, the blessed. It earned this rieh addition on account of its teeming soil, its rich and easily-won harvests, the pleasantness of its climate, its temperate air, the unfailing beauty with which its fields greet the eye, and the richness of its products. The fantasy which inspired the 308 EXCERPTA CYPRIA.

View PDF version of this page


  Previous First Next  
 
 
 
 
 
Our banners   Bibliography   Global Folio
All materials from this site are permitted for non commersial use unless otherwise indicated.
If you reduplicate documents from here you have to indicate Cyprus Explorer as a source and place link to us.
Created at June 2008
              Яндекс.Метрика