HISTORY ETHNOGRAPHY NATURE WINE-MAKING SITE MAP
Selected and rare materials, excerpts and observations from ancient, medieval and contemporary authors, travelers and researchers about Cyprus.
 
 
 
 
uses Google technology and indexes only and selectively internet - libraries having books with free public access
 
  Previous Next  

CLAUDE DELAVAL COBHAM
Exerpta Cypria
page 326

View PDF version of this page

whom the wise Solon gave counsel. Cyprian or called the town after his name, and Solon in return touched his lyre, and sang to him these lines :— Long vnay'st thou rule them both, new town, and laud of thy fathers; Town that shall bear my name, laud that thine own shall recall I Happy and famed be thine isle! But me o'er the great windy waters Swift ships bear to obey bests of the Cyprian Queen. Here was a temple of Aphrodite and Isis. Hence came Stasanor, one of the companions of Alexander, who became himself a rnler. Hence too sprung the learned poet Aratos, who nourished under Autigouos, son of Demetrius Poliorcetes. He exactly imitated Hesiod, and composed works about the aspects of the sky, about Homer and his Iliad, about osteology and medicine, and other poems. Next is the point of Crommyon, called Carmasiki, and opposite it, at no givat distance in Cilicia Tracheia, is Anemourion. Then Lapidos, an ancient city built by Laconians, which had a harbour aud docks. It was styled by the Latins amabiHs, or the lovable, on account of the wonderful beauty of its situation. Vestiges of stately buildings are still seen there. Kyrineia, Kyrine, Keronia or Keraunia, a town with a small fort and a tiny harbour, has nothing to show but ruins, signs of ite former splendour. It was built by the great Cyrus, King of the Persians, after he had overcome the nine Kings of Cyprus. Next after Kyrineia came Aphrodision or Idalia, a city famous for its giOve sacred to Aphrodite, in which was the temple Aphrodision, dedicated to the goddess whom the Phoenicians worshipped there under the name of Astarte. The grove was called in Phoenician Idalach, the place of the goddess, whence Idalion. There grew in it the sweet herb mnaramts, which the French call marjolaine, the Italians »10130»·«««, of whose sweet savour Vergil sings (i33u. I. G91—4). Over the limbs of her Ascan the tranquil waters of sleep Venus bestows, then bears him to groves ou Idalia'a steep, Lulled on her bosom. Beneath him a yielding amaracus laid Folds him iu briglnVhued flowers and in fragrant bowery shade. From this plant is made the oil or ointment called by its name. The Cyprian amaracus was thought by the ancients to be the sweetest of all. They hold it to be deadly to scorpions. The hog, that mud-loving, filthiest of creatures, avoids its scent. Achaion Acte, where Teucer and his companions lauded. Then Carpasia, one of the most notable cities of the island, where Philo, the commentator of the Scriptures, was bishop. As a deacon he was at Rome, in the train of Pulcheria, the sister of Arcadius and Honorins. There she fell sick, and learning that God healed the sick by the hand of Epiphaneios, bishop of Coiistantia, Fililo was sent to bring the saint to Home. He came to Cyprus, and following a revelation from above, Epiphaneios about A.D. 401 consecrated him bishop of Carpasia, and being himself about to sail for Rome left Philo in charge of the church of Constantia. Of the .cities of the interior, the largest and most remarkable is Lencosia or Nicosia, a famous city, tho capital of the island. In it resides the archbishop of Cyprus and the Governor of the island, just as it was the royal residence of the former Kings. Their palaces, once distinguished for architectural beauty, have suffered that ruin and disgrace which has destroyed all its ancient buildings. The stately church called S. Sophia, in which the Latin Kings of Cyprus were crowned, has suffered the same change and is now a Turkish mosque. The situation of the city is channhig, wells and springs and verdant orchards •sus EXCERPTA CYPRIA.

View PDF version of this page


  Previous First Next  
 
 
 
 
 
Our banners   Bibliography   Global Folio
All materials from this site are permitted for non commersial use unless otherwise indicated.
If you reduplicate documents from here you have to indicate Cyprus Explorer as a source and place link to us.
Created at June 2008
              Яндекс.Метрика