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CLAUDE DELAVAL COBHAM
Exerpta Cypria
page 337

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SIBTHORR :Ì27 terrible Κουφή. A monk of Famagusta. bas the reputation of preventing the fatal effects of the venom of this serpent by incantation ; aud from the credulity of the people had gained a sort of universal credit through the island. AVe were frequently shewn as precious stones compositions fabricated by artful Jews; these were said to be taken out of the head of the Κουφή; and were worn as amulets to protect the wearers from the bite of venomous animals. Memoirs, p. 285.] After riding four hours through a rising plain wo reachod Annidia, a village pleasantly situated about half α mile from the sea. Near the roadside I observed the Scabrósa prolifera, and a species of arum, nnnoticed by Linmeus, called by the Greeks Αγρωκο· λοκάσω, and a rare species of Linum with a red flower, the Linnm viscosnm of Liunams. The low hills round Armidia were covered with the Cistns incauus now in flower. On the beach I gathered the Scorzonera tingitana and a new species of Geranium. We shot also a bird of the Gralla kind, the Hamiatopus ostralcgus of L. After a ride of four hours over an extensive plain, we reached at sunset a small convent in the outskirts of Famagusta. April IS. Early in the morning we walked to Famagusta, a melancholy placo now almost depopulated: in the time of tho Venetians the fairest city in tho island; and renowned for the brave defence they made in it against the infidels. The lines of the fortification which are very considerable are still sufficient to show the extent and former strength of this place ; they are now suffered by the Turks to moulder away in ruins. Some cannon, with the arms of Venice, were lying dismounted on the ramparts ; the Lieutenant of the fortress pointed to them with an ail1 of triumph. In the enceinte grew among the rubbish the Aloe vera, the Iris germanica and fiorentina in great abundance. Leaving the fortress we passed through the streets now deserted, a melancholy picture of Turkish desolation ; the gateway by which wo returned to tfie convent was paved with cannon bulls. At noon after a ride of five hours we arrived at Upsera, about a mile from Famagusta, we observed some small lakes to our right and left: these were frequented by different species of Grolla): wo had shot the Anion, alba, which flew over the convent, in the morning. The desolation wo had observed at Famagusta extended itself along the countiy we now traversed. We passed by the mouldering ruins of several Greek villages, and slept- at α Greek cottage at Upsera. This like other villages we had passed seemed by the desertion of its inhabitants to be hastening to ruin : it was pleasantly situated on the side of α hill : α fertile vale stretched beneath it, bounded by the appreaohing mountains of Antiphoniti. April 39. At oight in the morning we left Upsera, and passing through the vale below, gradually ascended into tho mountain of Antiphoniti. At noon we arrived at the convent, most romantically situated, having a view of the sea and a distant sight of tho high land of Gnramauia. I was come here on the authority of Pococke to see the Lignum rhodium ; this the Greeks call ïylon Effendi. The Hegonmcnos of the convent, a very old man, offered himself ns my conductor, and leading me a few paces below the convent into a garden now covered with rubbish, pointed out a tree which on examination I found to bo the Liqnidambar styraciflua. The trunk of it was much hacked, and different bite hod been carried off by the curious and superstitions, as an ornament to their cabinets and churches. This was probably the same tree that Pococke had seen. To ascertain the Lignum rhodium has been much wished by the naturaliste. An American tree growing in the swamps of Virginia seems to have little chum to be considered as that which shonld produce it. The name of Nylon Effendi and tho tradition of the convent testify the reputation in which this tree liad long been held in the island ; it was probably at first introduced by the Venetians during them possession of it. I could not discover, cither from observation or enquiry, that it was to be found in any other part of Cyprus ; nor do I recollect that the Styrax liqnidambar has been

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