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CLAUDE DELAVAL COBHAM
Exerpta Cypria
page 338

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mentioned by any botanist as an oriental tree. AVhether the Lignum rhodium of the shops is the wood of this tree, or not, I am doubtfnl ; the Aspalathus primus of Dioscorides 1 think is certainly the Lignum rhodium of the ancients; he describes it as a thorny shrub, probably a species of Spartinm, which the Cypriotes still call Aspalathi ; his Aspa lath us Becnndus, which also grows in the island, is certainly the Spartium spinosum. The Pinns pinea, the Cypress, the Andrachue are the principal trees that grow in this mountainous track. In the crevices of the rocks I found a few curious plants. Scutellaria peregrina, Ononis ornithopodioides, Polygala nionsp. and a species of Valeriana (orbiculato) with an undivided leaf, which seems distinct from Val. calcitrapa. In the environs of the cloister we shot two species of Loxia; one which I have called L. varia; the other L. cinerea. April 20. At eleven we left the convent of Antiphoniti and descended the mountain to the sea-coast. In our journey I observed the Papaver somniferum with a small blue flower growing in great abundance; the plant which we find sometimes iu waste ground and in corn-fields in England has probably escaped there from the garden. We now coasted along the shore, rocky, and much indented. I here observed several curious plants, Arenaria cerignensis, Scabiosa ceriguensis, Cheiranthns littoreus, Tenerumi croticum. Leaving the shore, we entered into a more difficult tract of country called Bel Paese; a ridge of mountains running from north to south, terminated in some rising hills, which, sloping towards the sea, were richly cultivated with corn. Xear Cerignes, where we arrived rather late in the evening, I discovered a beautiful species of Salvia, S. cerignensis, April 21. Having employed the morning in drawing, and putting our plants iu paper, we rode ont after dinner to the monastery of Lapasis, a fine remain of an old Gothic structure. In the court below was a sarcophagus, bnt of bad workmanship. We were told that on the summit of the mountains to the left of Lapasis were the ruins of an ancient temple: onr guides who had excited onr curiosity refused to satisfy it, by risking their mules on the steep road which led to them. Captain Kuiery and myself attempted on foot to reach the summit of this distant mountain. The sun shone with uncommon force; nor did the least breeze mitigate the fervour of its rays. After a very hot and fruitless walk, we came back, finding the summit too distant to reach it, and return before night. We joined onr companions at the monastery of Lapasis, situated in a beautiful recess, surrounded by corn-fields and vineyards, and shaded by trees, whose foliage is kept green by several purling rills, that watered the environs of this romantic spot. I collected a few piauta in this excursion: the Hedysarnm saxatile grew on the mountain; and the Styrax officinale was frequent in the hedges near the monastery. April 22. We left Cerignes at nine, a paltry town with a port which cames on a small commerce with Carauuinia :, we passed the mountains of Bel Paese by a narrow defile; on the sides of which grew the1 Moluccella fruticosa ; descending, we entered the plains of Messa ria ; and about two arrived at Nicosia. Ou the mountains we observed several large birds which our guides told us were Eagles, aero». 1 was not so fortunate as to procure one of them during my stay in the island, but from their flight I should suppose them to be Vultures. Near Nicosia I observed the Salvia argentea» In the evening we visited a small convent of Spanish friars, under the protection of France and Spain; and slept at the house of the Danish dragoman, for whom W had brought a letter. April 23. The Governor oil the island, being informed of my arrival, sent a message that he wished to see me; he was a venerable old Turk with no other complaint than that of age and its companion, debility and. loss of appetite. He received me with groat politeness: onr Ambassador, Sir R. Ainslie, Had procured ine letters for him. Having felt his pnlse, and 328 EXCERPTA CYPRIA.

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