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CLAUDE DELAVAL COBHAM
Exerpta Cypria
page 380

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Salines, has a Zabit (Digdaban or Vice-Governor) appointed by the Muselliin at Nicosia, a Qazi from Constantinople, a Serdar or captain of the police, and in the Marina, or town on the shore, which forms a town by itself, a Qol-aghasi, or commandant of the fort, whicli is so greatly decayed that one would think it could scarcely be worse : it has only twelve guns, besides two or three which are altogether useless. There is also a Chief Collector of Customs at the Custom House on the shore, who has a Greek assistant, and a chief and second clerk. The Zabit pays to the Governor for his post a hundred piastres a month; he gets no pay, but receives certain fees from the natives, and what he can squeeze from the people who are brought before his judgment seat. He is generally very poor. The Qazi pays ISO piastres a month to Constantinople for his post. As he too has no fixed salary, he gleans his income from the lawsnits which come before him, and from certain fees for Hams &c. The Serdar pays 500 p. a year for his post. He gets from every newly married Greek in the District of Larnaca 45 paras : this is all his income except what he can make by petty extortions. All Christian vessels, except those of Ragusa, pay half-yearly 15 piastres anchor-money, which is divided between the officials at the Custom Honso, and the fort, and the Consul. The French Consul is now no longer paid by the Chamber of Commerce, but by his Government. He has with him a French dragoman, also paid by his Government, who serves (according to the latest orders regulating the French establishment in the Levant) as Chancellor. When the Consul retires from his office he gets a moderate pension for his life. The Venetian Consul was heretofore appointed by the Great Council in Venice, which had the right of choice only : all the Consular business went to the Conncil of the Savij, by whom all decisions thereon were taken. The Consul's pay consists in 2 per centum as fees on all merchandise imported or exported, which is paid without deduction at the Custom House. All expenses connected with the Consulate, such as gifts to the Turks, to Janisavies &c. the Consul has to pay himself. The Republic of Ragusa has also a Consul, who is in business. He has no salary, but takes 2 p.c. like his Venetian colleague. In accordance with an agreement with the Porte Ragnsans pay only this 2 p.c. as duty: but then they are tributaries of the Porte. In 1785 a Russian Consul also established himself here, and hoisted lus flag, like those of England, France, and Venice. "When the war broke out between the Porte and Russia he went off in great haste. As a Greek he was much courted by his co-religionists, and all their grievances were settled by him. Naples has a Vice-Consul, who gets 600 piastres a year to meet gifts to the Turks &c. But the Neapolitans have no commerce at all with Cyprus, and there are only three or four inconsiderable merchants here of that nation. Spain has since March, 1787, a Vice-Consul appointed by the Minister in Constantinople, but he has neither subjects nor business. In May, 1788, for the first time in the memory of man a Spanish frigate and a brig appeared off the island. Their Commander promised the Vice-Consul to report on his position at Madrid, and to exert himself to secure for him, if possible, a sufficient salary to uphold the honour of his nation. Tlie English Consul, who since 1786 has also the superintendence of the Consulate at Aleppo, has the largest business connection in the island, and accordingly the greatest influence. The Bay of Larnaca, or of the Salines, is the meeting-place of ships for all this part of the Levant. It is safe at all seasons, and when vessels meet with bad weather at Dannata, Jaffa, or even on the open sea they fly here for shelter, or come expressly to take provisions. French ships especially leave behind them in the Bogliaz or Bay of Damiata their cable-tow 370 EXCERPTA CYPRiA.

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