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CLAUDE DELAVAL COBHAM
Exerpta Cypria
page 381

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with a buoy, and come to Salines : when the bad weather is over they return and take up their tow. Throughout the greatest part of the year South and West winds prevail, rising generally an hour before mid-day. Limasol also is a resort for ships in all weathers. The town is well enough, particularly as to business. The English Consul has here a Greek as Vice-Consul to give assistance to British ships calling here, and to see what is wanted in the town and neighbourhood. Liinasol lms' a Zabit, η Qazi, a Serdar and an Ashab-aghasi, or commandant ; but the fort, like the rest, needs many repairs. Paphos—veiy few vessels touch here, though in good years it is very convenient to load wheat here, when the Governor allows the export. It has an Alay Bey, a Qazi, a Serdar and a Qol-aghasi. Cherigna—few ships come here, but the French keep always two small vessels at the eervicc of the Porte, to carry the Miri, or revenue accruing to the Grand Signor, from this town to Selefka iu Caramania, and bring back other Government officials with their suites. Hitherto one has been a sloop, the S. bonis, the other a little brig, the Maria, These vessels are also at the disposal of the Governor, and when necessary, visit various ports of Caramania, Rhodes and Damiata. In the last war the writer by their means pnt all Ms belongings into safety; he considered them only as ships in the service of the Grand Signor, and of no other Power besides. There are here a Zabit-agha, a Qazi, a SerJar and a Qol-aghasi, commandant of the caetle, which was once very strong, and well able to withstand for η long time the attack of an enemy: now it is in quite as bad a condition as the rest. All the Turks in the Government service, in Nicosia, Famagusta, Larnaea and other parts have no pay. They buy their posts, but to recoup themselves for their outlay, and make something over, the Governor surrenders certain of his privileges for their support. The Turks who are called sherifs pay yearly to the Governor 71 piastres, the rest 19£ Ρ· The tribute paid by the Greek is fixed at the yearly sum of 70 piastres for the rich, and 40 for the poor : even boys of twelve years pay something. From the Greeks especially is the tax exacted which is called ghurema (disbursements for service and quarters) when some great personage travels through the island, or when other persons are sent round by the Governor. After their departure the tax-collector makes his demand under the name of provata on every person in the towns and villages through which the traveller passed. These gentlemen travel too entirely at the public cost. Yearly produce. The Saltworks of Larnaca yield every year 10,000 cartloads of pure white salt. Each cartload (araba) carries 1000 okes of 400 drains. Each oke is about 2| Eng. lbs. : a cartload of this salt sells on the spot for 5 J p. The Salines at Limasol yield 15,000 cartloads, but the salt is far inferior to that of Larnaea, and the cartload costs only 3 piastres. The quantity of salt from both places might be much greater if a little more care were taken for its orderly collection. Cotton, the chief article of produce, brings in about 3500 kintals (the kintal, or cantar, equals 100 rotoli, the rotolo 720 drams). The price of cotton varies greatly, depending chiefly on the orders from Europe. Thirty or forty years ago the kintal cost from CO to 75 piastres. Twenty years ago and onwards the price was 150 to 275 p. the kintal. In 1784 it foil again to 135, and even 120 p. But as a rule in onr time the kintal fetches between 160 and 175 p. When the island has a population corresponding to its size, and the locusts, which for a hundred years have been its unceasing scourge, are exterminated, it must yield 47—2 M. DE VEZIN. 371

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