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CLAUDE DELAVAL COBHAM
Exerpta Cypria
page 388

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CLARKE. TI» Rev. Edward Daniel Clarke, LL.D., Fellow of Jeans College, and Professor of Mineralogy at Cambridge, died on March 9, 1822, His Travels in various countries of Europe, Asia and Africa, sumptuously printed and illustrated, were issued in quarto volumes between 1810 and 1823. I transcribe from Part the second (Greece, Egypt and the Holy Land), Section the first (1812), pp. 808—856, omitting the notes, chiefly référencée to Dapper, Heyman and other travellers, whose remarks on Cyprns I have already edited for the Excerpta Cypria. Dr Clarke visited Cyprus in EH. frigate Ceres between June 6 and 16, 1801. Ho notes the temperature during his stay as varying between 77 and 85 degrees Fahrenheit. About six o'clock in the evening of June the third 1801 we made land north-east and by east It fell to my lot to give the first intelligence of its appearance, being aloft upon the look-out in the phuttock shrouds. Cape Blanco, anciently Curias promontory, then hove in view (to use the language of seamen), and soon after the whole island was seen indistinctly looming amidst thick fogs. It appeared very high and mountainous. We had such light breezes and frequent calms, that we did nut reach Salines Bay until 3 o'clock p.m. on Saturday the sixth of June. We had coasted the whole island from its western extremity, and so near to the shore that we had a distinct survey of the features of the country. We saw the fortress and town of Baffa, anciently Paphos, backed by high mountains. The coast towards the west much resembles the southern part of the Crimea ; the villages and cultivated places being near the shore, and all behind being craggy and mountainous. From Baffa to Limassol near the spot where the ancient city of Amathus stood, the coast appears very fertile, and more so than any part of the island that we afterwards visited. Towards the south-western district the country is well covered with forest trees, and particularly the neighbourhood of Baffa. Limassol produces the finest muscadine wine of Cyprns; some of tins pours like oil, and may be kept to a great age. The wine called Commanderiez is, however, held principally in esteem among the natives. As we sailed into Salines Bay, anciently that of Cititvm, now called Άλΐκ«, from a oluster of salt lakes near the sea, the town of Salines appeared covered with that white fog, so much dreaded, and so well known in Italy, by the name of Mal-aria. The mountains behind the place were partially concealed by this unwholesome vapour. It rose from the shore and buildings like smoke. Whenetci* this appearance is pi-esented the heat upon tho island is excessive. Few of tne natives venture out of their houses during mid-day; and all journeys, even those of caravans, are performed in tho night; the dews are then neither abundant nor dangerous; in this respect Cyprus differs entirely from Egypt, and from all the neighbouring shores. Its porte are more sultry than any other in the Levant. Salines and the towns situated on the eastern and north-eastern coasts of the island are subject to such dangerous temperature, that, in the months of June and July, persons fall victims to the afflicting malady called a sun-stroke, or coup de soleil, if they venture out at noon without the precaution of carrying an umbrella. The inhabitants, especially of the lower order, wrap their heads as if exposed to the rigour of a severe winter; being always covered with a turban over which, in their journeys, they place a thick shawl, many times folded. The great heat experienced upon the eastern coasts of Cyprus is owing to two causes; to the situation of the island with respect to the Syrian, Arabian, and Libyan deserts; and to its mountainous nature, preventing the cooler winds, the west, and north-west, from the low shores to the east and north-cast. 3/8 EXCERPTA CYPRIA.

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