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GIOVANNI MARITI
Travels in the Island of Cyprus
page 24

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merchant vessels but the ships of war of all sovereigns anchor, I have thought it well to give an account of what takes place on their arrival, during their stay, and at their departure, showing the ceremonial to be observed, and the compliments to be paid to them, for ignorance on these points is a cause of inconvenience to merchantmen, and often even to the consuls. Every war vessel then of the Christian sovereigns is saluted, just as it is on the point of dropping anchor, by all the merchant-men of every Christian European Power, to which it replies with so many guns as the rules of its own navy prescribe. It anchors and waits the salute of the Turkish fort, which cannot be fired without the order {buyuruldu) of the Governor of Nicosia—a messenger is sent to obtain this order, as it lies with the Governor to grant it or refuse it. Very often the consuls being warned of the arrival of a warship of their several sovereigns, obtain the buyuruldu beforehand, and immediately the ship comes in it is saluted by the fort, and replies with the same number of guns. The masters of the ships of the same nation are obliged, after having saluted, to go in person to report themselves to the captain. Meanwhile the consul causes notice to be given through his dragoman to his fellow consuls of the arrival of such and such a man of war, and they hoist the flags of their several consulates, while he goes with all his staff and fellow countrymen to congratulate the captain on his happy arrival. Upon going on board a vessel whose captain has any official rank or title a consul carries his flag on the prow of his boat, a distinction which is not used in Christian ports, but is necessary here to make a show before the Turks, to give the consuls a greater importance, and to exact for them greater respect. They are received on board with sundry guns, and the same compliment is paid them on their return to the shore. If the captain desires to land, he is received on the first occasion at the landing place by all his countrymen, the consul himself, and the officials of the other consulates, who 20 Concerning the Port [CH.

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