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GIOVANNI MARITI
Travels in the Island of Cyprus
page 25

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II] and Town of the Salines 21 accompany him to the house in which he is to stay, generally the consular residence. While the captain is leaving his ship for the shore he receives a salute from his own vessel, and on the first occasion, from all the other vessels of his nation, while other ships hoist an ensign just as a compliment. When a merchant ship of the same sovereign wishes to sail, besides taking its papers from the consul, permission must also be asked from the captain of the man of war, without this it cannot leave the port. On the arrival of a Turkish war vessel the consuls imme-diately hoist their flags. All European vessels do the same, and fire salutes of several guns, to which the Turk replies with one gun. The masters are then obliged to wait upon the Turkish captain and inform him concerning their destination and cargo. The consuls send their dragomans on board, accompanied by a Janissary, with messages of compliment. The warships of Christian princes fire the same salutes, which are returned gun for gun, while an officer makes the usual complimentary visit. The fort of the Salines salutes a newly arrived Turkish vessel with sundry guns : the captain replies with more or less, as he pleases. When a Turkish man of war (or caravel) is in the harbour no merchantman can leave without the permission of the Turkish captain, which is never granted on the spot without the expenditure of some sequins—a clear and simple robbery. European captains are free of this exaction if a warship of their own nation chances to be in port at the moment. They can then leave after paying the ordinary compliment of informing the Turk of their intention. No public notice is taken of the departure of a man of war of any Power from the station—the vessels only hoist their ensigns. The salutes and compliments exchanged between the men of war of Christian princes are regulated by the rank of the respective commanders. The French and English have a mutual arrangement excusing each other from the custom.

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