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GIOVANNI MARITI
Travels in the Island of Cyprus
page 35

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ι ν] Of the City of Larnaca 31 white marble, which flakes off very readily, this too a product of the island. The windows are all glazed, and every house has its own garden. The largest houses in Larnaca, which for their size and good condition deserve to be called palaces, are these : that of Mr Tredues, who was English consul, now in the possession of MM. Pory, of French origin, where there is a hall capable of receiving comfortably 500 persons; it is adorned with ancient tapestries and pictures by good painters. The other apartments also are distinguished by equal good taste and proportions. It has stabling for 50 horses, and a most charming garden. The house inhabited by the French consul belongs to Terra Santa. This too has its merits, as well as those of the English consul, Sr Saraf, a Tuscan merchant, M. Saint Amand and M. Montagne, French merchants : that of the Venetian consul is worth a glance, and among private houses that of Sr Zambelli, a Venetian merchant, which is not yet finished, but whose cost will eventually reach 12,000 Florentine crowns. Consuls in Cyprus hoist over the consular houses the flags of their several sovereigns on all church feasts of obligation, on those of the patron saint and birthday of each prince, on the arrival of vessels carrying the same flag, of war vessels of the Grand Signor or other sovereigns, as well as on occasions when they pay official visits to the local authorities, or to their European colleagues. The same formality is observed on the death of a consul, officer or merchant, when the ensign is kept at "halfmast until the funeral is over ; and lastly during a riot, to protect from outrage the premises over which the flag flies. Besides their flags consuls can put up the arms of their sovereigns over the doors of their houses; some however prefer to set them in a reception room, so as not to expose them to chance insult. There are both Greeks and Turks who own fine and spacious houses, though not such as need particular mention, for they are of a wholly different and irregular style.

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