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GIOVANNI MARITI
Travels in the Island of Cyprus
page 103

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xxl Insurrection of 17 64 The rising was as popular as it was sudden, the mutineers were already 2000 in number, and had again seized the mills at Citerea, which they worked for their own needs only, while some of them were posted under the walls of Nicosia to prevent supplies entering the city. On August 18 the citizens made a sortie, but were promptly driven back by the rebels. These however saw that to hold out much longer they must strengthen their numbers, and began to impress the Turks, burning the houses and even the villages of the recusants, and so increased their force to 3000. On August 28 the Governor saw that the rebellion was spreading over the island, and bethinking himself of the straits in which he would find himself when the capital began to lack food, came to terms with the malcontents and promised and swore that he would never again exact money as the price of pardon, and that he had freely forgiven everybody. A calm followed, the gates were opened, and people went about their business. The mutineers however kept ready to assemble in case of need. Presently a French ship arrived with the bishops, and the servants and baggage of the new Governor, Suleiman Efendi, who landed shortly after at Cerines. By favours and presents he won over to the side of order Khalil Agha, head of the rebels, and praised openly his zeal for the common prosperity. This diplomatic flattery opened to him a safe passage from Cerines to Nicosia, but he entirely failed in inducing Khalil Agha to follow him, although his liberal offers included even the post of alai bey, or general of the cavalry. Khalil Agha knew how little he could trust this sudden politeness. On the arrival of Suleiman Efendi at Nicosia the island had two Governors, but Hafiz Mohammad Efendi refused absolutely to abandon his post until the rebellion was finally crushed, for up to this point he had gallantly defended the city. Suleiman made no objection, for he was an aged man, chiefly interested in his own comfort. 7—2

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