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GIOVANNI MARITI
Travels in the Island of Cyprus
page 135

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ххн] Consuls some exaction or injustice on the part of the island government are treated with proper consideration. In cases of a war between two Powers their representatives exchange no formal visits. In the last war between England and France the English consul conducted business with his French colleague through the Tuscan chancellor and dragoman. A consul invites his fellow subjects to be present at all official visits. The formal visits paid by a consul to a Governor or other high Turkish official are preceded by gifts, of greater or less value according to the rank of the recipient. In Cyprus such visits are only paid to the Governor, if he comes to Larnaca, to the Digdaban and Qazi, or to any passing Pasha who may care to accept them. In the case of the Governor the hour is fixed and a dragoman and janissary sent to carry the present, which generally consists of garments of cloth or stuff. Then the consul and his colony start, preceded by two janissaries wearing dolmans, a long red gown with black trimmings, and the cap called stemma on their heads. After them come the dragomans, then the consul, who is followed by his colony. An official is deputed to receive the consul at the door of the Governor's palace, and to conduct him to the hall of audience, which is lined with choqadars and chawushes. The Governor enters from another room, and the chawushes shout "ya Allah!" and Arabic phrases meaning "God save our Master." The consul takes his seat on a chair which he has sent expressly from his own house, and the Governor sits on a divan or sofa, a kind of couch covered with printed calico or stuff, and furnished with cushions. The consul's suite sit on the same sofa at a distance from the Governor. The other Turks and the servants stand, the choqadars and chawushes round the Governor, in a respectful attitude, their hands crossed on their breasts and their eyes fixed on their master, whose least look or sign they understand and obey. While the first compliments are exchanged neither the consul nor his suite take off their hats : they press their 9—2

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