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GIOVANNI MARITI
Travels in the Island of Cyprus
page 186

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they had suffered in these two attacks, changed their plan, and with greater fury than ever began again to batter our defences and shelters at all points, working more actively than ever. They made seven new forts closer under the fortress, brought up the guns from the more distant works, and mounted 80 fresh pieces. On the day and night of July 8 their fire was so brisk that 5000 shots were counted, and they shattered our parapets till it was only with immense toil that we could repair them, for our labourers were killed one after another by cannon-shot, or by the incessant hail of musketry, and but few were left. The shelter behind the ravelin was so damaged by shots and mines that no platform was left, because in strength-ening the parapets from within we encroached on the platform, which we were obliged to lengthen with planks. Captain Maggio constructed a mine under this ravelin, so that when we could no longer hold it, we might abandon it to the enemy, and inflict on him some signal damage. THIRD ATTACK. On July 9 they made the third assault on the ravelin, on the great tower of St Nappa and that of the Andruzzi, on the curtain and great tower of the Arsenal. It lasted over six hours, and at all four points the Turks were driven back, but the ravelin was abandoned with great loss on both sides. The defenders could not in that small space use their pikes to any purpose, and when they wanted to retire, according to the order given by Signor Baglione, they fell into disorder, and retreated mixed up with the Turks. Our mine was fired, and we saw with horror the destruction of more than 1000 of the enemy, and more than 100 of our men. Captain Roberto Malvezzi died on the spot, and Captain Marchetto of Fermo was grievously wounded : at the attack on the Arsenal 'Captain David Noce the Quartermaster was killed, and I was wounded by a splinter. This attack lasted five long hours, and at all The Siege of Famagusta 183

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