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CHARLES G. ADDISON, ESQ. The history of the Knights Templars, Temple Church, and the Temple

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CHARLES G. ADDISON, ESQ.
The history of the Knights Templars, Temple Church, and the Temple
page 33



THE KNIGHTS TEMrLARS. so esquire ; but if that esquire serre any knight gratis, and for charity, it is not lawful to chide him, nor to strike him for any fault. " ΧΧΧΠ. Ve order you to purchase for all the knights desiring to serre Christ in purity of spirit, horses fit for their daily occasions, and whatever is necessary for the due discharge of their profession. And we judge itfitting and expedient to bare the horses valued by either party equally, and let the price be kept in writing, that it may not be forgotten. And whatsoever shall be necessary for the knight, or his horses, or his esquire, adding the furniture requisite for the horses, let it be bestowed out of the same house, according to the ability of that honse. If, in the meanwhile, by some mischance it should happen that the knight has lost his horses in the service, it is the duty of the Master and of the house to find him others ; but, on this being done, tbe knight himself, through the love of God, should pay half the price, the remainder, if it so please him, he may receive from the community of the brethren. " XXXIII It is to be holden, that when anything shall have been enjoined by the Master, or by him to whom the Master hath given authority, there must he no hesitation, but the thing must be done without delay, as though it had been enjoined from heaven : as the truth itself says, In the hearing of the ear he hath obeyed me. " XXXV When in thefield, after they shall have been sent to their quarters, no knight, or esquire, or servant, shall go to the quarters of other knights to see them, or to speak to them, without the order of the superior before mentioned. We, moreover, in council, strictly command, that in this house, ordained of God, no man shall make war or make peace of his own free will, but shall wholly incline himself to the will of the Master, so that he may follow the saying of the Lord, / came not to do mine own wall, but the will of him that tent me. " XXXVII. We will not that gold or silver, which is the mark of private wealth, should ever be seen on your bridles, breastplates, or spurs, nor should it be permitted to any brother to buy such. If, indeed, such like furniture shall have been charitably bestowed upon you, the gold and silver


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