Help us create a biggest collection of medieval chronicles and manuscripts on line.
#   A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z 
Medieval chronicles, historical sources, history of middle ages, texts and studies

BLOSS C.A. Heroines of the Crusades


Sir John Froissart's Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the Ajoining Countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV in 12 volumes 

Chronicles of Enguerrand De Monstrelet (Sir John Froissart's Chronicles continuation) in 13 volumes 

  Previousall pages


Heroines of the Crusades
page 114

And christian humility. Whereat to punish his arrogance, Our Lady sent him sore mischance, And dire adversity. 4. Sir Isumbras to the hunt has gone, Riding so gallantly, With hawk and hound in the dewy morn, When a vision bright above him born, Appeared in the clear blue sky. He saw a maiden meek and fair, An angel I wist was she, A messenger sent to bid him prepare For chill calamity. 5. A woful man was the knight that day, He turned him home in sore dismay, When his good steed fell and died, And hawk and hound of life bereft, Sir Isumbras in the forest left, With no living thing beside. When to him there came his little foot page, As fast as he might hie. My noble master, a sad message, It is that I bear to thee. "Thy proud castell lies in ruins low, Thy lady and children escaped the blow, But and with jeopardy." 6. The knight bowed meekly to heaven's decree ; A wiser and sadder man was he, And with his lady and children, three, Sir Isumbras boune him o'er the sea— A penitent pilgrim he would be To holy Palestine. Through seven weary lands they went— The strength of the babes was wellnigh spent, For charity, cold was their nourishment. They came to a wood, with flowers besprent— To a rapid river of broad extent, Where never the sunbeams shine. 7. His eldest born, Sir Isumbras bore With tenderest care to the farther shore ; But ere he returned again, A lion fierce from the thicket sprang— The little one tore from that cruel strand, Nor him might they regain. 8. He found his lady weeping, full lorn, For in his absence a leopard strong, ELEANOR.

  Previous First Next  

"Medievalist" is an educational project designed as a digital collection of chronicles, documents and studies related to the middle age history. All materials from this site are permitted for non commersial use unless otherwise indicated. If you reduplicate documents from here you have to indicate "Medievalist" as a source and place link to us.