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FABIUS ETHELWERD THE CHRONICLE FROM THE BEGINNING OF THE WORLD TO A.D. 975

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FABIUS ETHELWERD
THE CHRONICLE FROM THE BEGINNING OF THE WORLD TO A.D. 975
page 26



seat ; and having confirmed their resolves, they chose an obscure person for their king ; and after some delay they turned their thoughts to raise an army and repulse those who were advancing. They collected together no small bodies of troops, and reconnoitred the enemy : their rage was excited : they joined battle, a miserable slaughter took place on both sides, and the kings were slain. Those of them who were left made peace with the hostile army. In the same year died Eanwulf, duke of Somerset ; also bishop Ealstan, fifty years after his succession to the bishopric, in the diocese called Sherborne. There also his body now reposes ; and that of the above-named duke in the monastery called Glastonbury. A. 868. After one year therefore, the army of the pagans, of whose arrival we have spoken above, measured out their camp in a place called Snotingaham [Nottingham], and there they passed the winter, and Burhred king of the Mercians, with his nobles, consented to their remaining there without reproach. A. 869. At the end of a year therefore, the army was transported to York, and there also they measured out their camp in the winter season. A. 870. Again after a year they departed, and passed through Mercia into East-Anglia, and there measured out their camp for the winter at Thetford. King Edmund carried on war against them for a short time, but he was slain there by them, and his body lies entombed at a place called Beodoricsworthe,* and the barbarians obtained the victory, but with the loss of their king soon afterwards : for king Hingwar died the same year ; archbishop Ceolnoth also died that same year, and is buried in the city of Canterbury. A. 871. After one year therefore the army of the barbarians above-mentioned set out for Reading, and the principal object of the impious crew was to attack the West-Saxons ; and three days after they came, their two consuls, forgetting that they were not on board their fleet, rode proudly through fields and meadows on horseback, which nature had denied to them.J • Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk. f I shall be glad if my readers will find a better translation for this obscure and inflated passage.


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