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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.2

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.2
page 37



long lances. This engagement began about vefpers, and lafted until night parted them ; for, foon after vefpers, there came on fuch a fog, they could fcarcely diftinguifh each other ; they therefore fepa-rated, caft anchor, and got their fliips in orderi but did not difarm, for they intended renewing the fight the next day. About midnight, a violent ftorm arofe ; and fo tremeudous was it, that it feemed as if the world would have been deftroyed : there were not, on either fide, any fo bold, but who wifhed themfelves on fhore ; for thefe barges and veflels drove fo furioufly againft each other, that they feared they would go to pieces. The Englilh lords inquired of the failors what was beft to be done : they anfwered, to difembark as foon as they could; for there were fuch rifles at fea, that, if the wind ihould continue as violent as it then was, there would be danger of their being all drowned. They therefore drew up their an-chors, fet their fails about half a quarter, and made off. On the other hand, the Genocfe weighed their anchors, and put off to fea; for their veflels, being fo much larger than the Englifh, could wea-ther the tempeft more fecurely ; and alfo, if they ihould drive too near the ftiore, they ran a rifk of being wrecked, which made them take to the deep. As they were going off, they fell in with four Eng-lifh veflels, laden with provifions, which had kept out of the engagement : they feized them, and took them in tow. The wind and tempeft were fo vehement, that, in one day, they were driven more . ^ than 1 24


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