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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.2

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.2
page 84



thé earl of Pembroke in Bergerac, to meet him at an appointed place and hour ;. and alfo to the lord Stafford and fir Stephen Tombey, who were at tibourne. The earl of Derby then, accompanied by fir Walter Manny and the forces he had with him, took the road towards Auberoche as fecretly as poffible ; fbr he had guides who were acquainted with all the bye-roads. They came to Libouftie, where they ftaid a whole day for the earl of Pem-broke but hearing no tidings of him, and being impatient to fuccour their friends who were fo dif-treffed, the earl of Derby, the earl of Oxford, fir Walter Manny, fir Richard Haftings, fir Stephen Tombey, the lord Ferrers, and other knights, fet out for Libqurae: riding all night, they came on the morrow within two leagues of Auberoche. They entered a wood, when, alighting from their horfes, they tied them to the trees, and allowed them to pafture, in expectation of the arrival of the earl of Pembroke : they waited all that morning, and until noon, in vain, not knowing what to do ; for they were but three hundred lances and fix hundred archers, and the French were from ten to twelve thoufand men. They thought it would be cowardice to fuffer their friends to be loft, when they were fo near them. At laft, fir Walter Manny faid, € Gentlemen, let us who are now here mount our horfes, lkirt this wood, and advance until we come to their camp : when we lhall be clofe to it, we will ftick fpurs into our horfes, and, with loud (houts, fall upon them. • It will be about their hour for fupper ; and we lhall fee them fo much difcom- F 4 fited.


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