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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.2

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.2
page 87



Il • \ 74 knights. They gave thanks and praifes to God, for having enabled them to overcome upwards of ten thoufand men, when they themfelves were not more than one thoufand, ineludïng«every one, and to refcue the town and caftie of Auberoche, in which were their friends, that muft have been cap-tured in two days time. " ' On the next morning, a little after fun-rife, the earl of Pembroke arrived with three hundred lances and four thoufand archers ; he had been informed of the event of the battle as they came along, and faid to the earl of Derby, € Certainly, coufin, you have neither been courteous, nor behaved honour-ably, to fight my enemies without waiting for me, feeing that you had fent for me ; and you might have been affured, that nothing fhould have pre-vented my coming to you/ The eail replied, f Fair coufin, we were very anxious for your ar-rival, and we waited for you from the morning until vefpers :• when we faw no appearance of your coming, we dared not wait longer ; for had our enemies' been informed of our arrival, they would have had the advantage over us ; but now, thanks to God, we have conquered them, and we pray of you to help us in conducting them to Bourdeaux/ They remained that day and night in Aube-roche : oh the next day early, they were armed and mouaied, and fet off, leaving there a Gafcon knight, in their intereft, as governor, named the lord Alexander of Chaumont. %kqf took the road to Bourdeaux, and carried with them the greater, part of their prifoners. CHAP.


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