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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.2

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.2
page 146



m they were coming, leaving their houfes and barns quite full, for they had neither means nor art to iave them. . The king of England and prince of Wales had,; in their battalion, about three thoufand men at arms, fix thoufand archers, ten thoufand infantry, without counting thofe that were under the mar-1 liais ; and they marched on in the manner I have before mentioned, burning and deftroying the coun-try, but without breaking their line of battle. They did not turn towards Coutances, but advanced to St. Lo, in €outantin, which in thofe days was % very rich and commercial town, and worth three fuch towns as Coutances. In the town of St. Lo was much drapery, and many wealthy inhabitants: among them, you might count eight or nine fcore that were engaged in commerce. When the king of England was come near to the town, he encamped •: he would not lodge in it for fear of fire. He fent, therefore, his advanced guard forward, who foon conquered it, at a trifling lofs, and completely plundered it, No one can imagine the quantity of jriches they found in it, nor the number of bales of cloth. If there had been any purchafers, they might have bought enough at a very cheap rate. - The Englilh then advanced towards Caen, which is a much larger town, ftronger, and fuller of dra-peries and all other forts of merchandize, rich citiy zens, noble dames and damfels, and fine churches. In particular, there are two very rich ijionafteries -K one dedicated to St. Stephen, and the other to the K 3 . Trinity.


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