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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.2

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.2
page 199



Raynald, lord of the lies, who governed the wild Scots, and whom alone they obeyed, iras fient to, and intreated to attend the Parliament. He com-plied with the requeft, and brought three-thoufand of the wildeft of his countrymen with him. When all the Scots were aifembled, they amounted together to about forty thoufand combatants : but they could not make their preparations fo fecretly as to prevent news of it coming to the knowledge Of the queen of England, who had taken up her refidence in the north, near the borders. She wrote, and fent fummons to all that were attached to the king of England to come to York by a cer-tain day.1 Many men at arms and archers, who had remained at home, put themfelves in motion, and advanced to Newcaftle-upon-T} ne, which the queen had appointed as the final place of ren-dezvous. In the mean while, the Scots fet out From Perth, and advanced the firft day to Dunfermline : the next day, they crofted a fmall arm of the fea ; but the king went to Stirling, crofted the water there on the morrow, and came to Edinburgh. Here they halted and numbered their men. There were full three thoufand knights and fquires, well armed, and thirty thoufand others, mounted on galloways. They marched to Roxburgh, the firft fortrefs belonging to the Englilh in their road, under the command of the lord William Montacute, who had lately creeled it againft the Scots. This caftle is handfome, and very ftrong ; the Scots, therefore, paffed on, without attacking it, and took up their ' quarters 186


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