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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.2

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.2
page 220



The earl of Flanders, who wis returned to his own country, mod among his own people, was con-tinually hawking, and pretended that this Englilh . alliance was perfectly agreeable to him. The Flem-ings'believed all he faid, and did not keep fo ftrict a guard upon him as before : but they were not then acquainted with the difpofition of their lord; for, however much he might diflemble in his out-ward behaviour, he was in his heart devoted to the French. It happened one day, in the fame week that he was to efpoufe the Englilh princefs, he went out a hawking : the falconer _ fled his hawk at a heron, and the earl did the fame with his : the two hawks purfued their game, and the earl galloped off, as if. following them, crying, € Hoye, hoye/ When he was at fome diltance from his keepers/and in the open fields, he ftuck fpurs into his horfe, and made fuch fpeed that he was foon out of fight : he did jiot flop until he was got into Artois, where he was fafe. He then went to king Philip in France, and related • to him and his nobles his adventures, who told him he had aëled wifely ; but the Englilh, on the contrary, accufed him of betraying and deceiving them. The king of England, neverthelefs, did not fail for this, to cultivate the friendship of the Flemings; for he knew that what had happened was not through their confent, but, on the contrary, that they were very touch enraged at it ; fo he was immediately fatisfied with the excufes they made him on the 7 occafion. • CHAP.


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