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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.2

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.2
page 244



year 1346, and furrendered about the end of Au- ' gull 1347. The king, ^ter he had prefented thefe* fix citizens to the queen, called to him fir Walter • Manny, don; and we fee, fome days afterward, this queen, fo generous, obtain, for her own profit, the connfcation of the houfes of this John Daire, whofe fife, H is faid/ fhe faved. On the other land, Edward is defcribed as obftinately bent on hating the venerable' Euftace de St. Pierre beheaded; and we fee, fhortly after, this fame Euftace de St. Pierre overwhelmed, as it were, wil^i gifla» The conqueror gives him houfes, considerable penfions, and even deigns to exprefs himfelf, that he only grants thefe firft favours until he (hail have more amply provided for him ; they are recom-penses by which he acknowledges beforehand the ferviees this citizen may render him, either by keeping good order in the town of Calais, or in watching over its fecurity. Here then is this famous St. Pierre, one day the hero, and the next the coraplaifant betrayer of his country : one moment the object of the revenge and cruelty of Edward, the next of his confidence and favour. * The intérêts of this prince forced him * to a neceiTary rigour. He wifhed to preferve Calais, as it opened té him an entrance into France ; and be could not leave their inhabi-tants too much attached to their own country not to hate its deftroyer. 4 Thofe who refufed to fwear fidelity to him were obliged to quit the town, and make room for a new population imported from England ; and this St. Pierre, this St. Pierre whofe noble courage fhould have rendered him the moft to be dreaded, is one of thofe whom the conqueror retains, and who is by him charged to overlook the conduce of others. • The Englilh monarch certainly fhewed.fighs of feverity. We fee, by the letter he wrote to the archbifhop of Canter-bury, that when Philip, encamped N near to Calais» had de-manded, as a' preliminary of peace, that the inhabitants fhould have liberty to quit the town with their fortunes, it Q3 was m


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