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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.2

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.2
page 272



the Spaniard, who was coming full fail. The king's fliip was large and ftiff; other wife fhe would have been funk, for that of the enemy was a great one* and the fhock of their meeting was more like the crafh of a torrent or tempeft : the rebpund caufed the caftle in the king's fhip to encounter that of the Spaniard ; fo that the ndaft of the latter was broken, and all in the caftle fell with it into the fea, when they were drowned. The Engliih veffel, however, fuffered, and let in water, which the knights cleared, and flopped fhe leak, without telling the king any thing of the matter. Upon examining the veffel he had engaged lying before him, he faid ; € Grapple my ihip with that; for I will have poffefBon of her/ His knights replied ; r Let her go her way: you fliall have better than her.9 That veffel failed on, and another large fhip bore down, and grappled with chains and hooks to that of the king. The fight now began in earneft, and the archers and crofs-bows on each fide were eager to ihoot and defend themfelves. The battle was not in one place, but in ten or twelve at a time. Whenever either party found themfelves equal to the enemy, or fuperior, they inftantly grappled, when grand deeds of arms were performed. The Engliih had not any advantage ; and the Spaniih Chips- were much larger and higher than their opponents, which gave them a great fuperiority in ihooting and calling ftonesand iron bars on board their ' enemy, which annoyed them exceedingly. . The knights on-board the king's ihip were in danger of finking, for the leak ftill admitted VOL. II. S water: 257


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