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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.2

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.2
page 274



êàcoftiàe Spmifh yeffiil, with which he grappled, flwuting, ' Derbj, to the refciK !' The engage-ment was now very warm, but did not laft long* for the fliip was taken, and all the crew thrown overboard, not one being faved. The prince, with hm men, infiantly embarked on board the Spaniard ; and fcarcely bad they done fir when his own veflel funk, which convinced them of the imminent dan-ger they had been in. . ; ^HE engagement was in other parts well conteft-ed by the Englilh knights, who exerted then*-felves, and need there was of it, for they found thofe who feared them not. Late in the evening, the Salle du Roi, commanded by lord Robert, de Namur, was,grappled by a large Spaniard, and tbe fight was very fevere. The Spaniards were deter-mined to gain this fliip ; and, the more effeftually to fucceed in carrying her off, they fet all their fails, took advantage of the wind, and, in fpite of what lord Robert and his crew could do, towed her out of the battle : for the Spaniard was of a more confiderable fize than the lord Robert's fhip, and therefore fhe mere eafily conquered. As they were thus towed, they pafled near the king's fhip, to whom they cried out, ' Refcue the Salle (du Roi/ but were not heard ; for it was dark; and, if they were heard, they were not refcued. The Spaniards would have carried away with eafe this prize, if it had not been for a gallant aét of one Hanequin, a S 2 fervant 259


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